Elements of Mental Philosophy: Abridged and Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

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Harper & brothers, 1842 - 480 strán (strany)
 

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The connexion between the mental and physical change not ca pable of explanation
26
of the meaning and nature of perception 14 Perception makes us acquainted with a material world
27
Of the primary and secondary qualities of matter
28
Of the secondary qualities of matter
29
CHAPTER III
30
Connexion of the brain with sensation and perception
30
Order in which the senses are to be considered 20 Of the sense and sensations of smell
32
Of perceptions of smell in distinction from sensations
33
Of the sense and the sensations of taste
34
CHAPTER IV
35
27
38
Origin of the notion of extension and of form or figure
40
On the sensations of heat and cold
41
Of the sensations of hardness and softness
42
Of certain indefinite feelings sometimes ascribed to the touch
44
Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly signified
45
L
46
Statement of the mode or process in visual perception
47
Organ of the sense of hearing 24 Varieties of the sensation of sound 25 Manner in which we learn the place of sounds
48
The idea of extension not originally from sight
49
Of the knowledge of the figure of bodies by the sight
50
Illustration of the subject from the blind
51
Measurements of magnitude by the
52
Of objects seen in a mist 41 of the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
53
Of the estimation of distances by sight
54
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
55
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
56
Of objects seen on the ocean
57
ib 54 55 56
58
Of habit in relation to the smell
59
Of habit in relation to the taste
60
Of habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
64
Other striking instances of habits of touch
65
Habits considered in relation to the sight
66
Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increase
68
Of habits as modified by particular callings and arts
69
The law of habit considered in reference to the perception of the outlines and forms of objects
70
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
71
Additional illustrations of Mr Stewarts doctrine 58 ib 59 60 62 64 65
72
CHAPTER VIII
73
Of conceptions of objects of sight
74
Of the influence of habit on our conceptions
76
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
77
Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
78
Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
81
Conceptions as connected with fictitious representations
82
73
88
74
89
76
91
77
92
ib 78
93
81
96
X
107
of our estimate of time in dreaming
113
Of the ideas of right and wrong
119
7
136
Of the use of correlative terms
142
DEMONSTRATIVE REASONING
143
Secondary laws and their connexion with the primary
147
vir Of relations of cause and effect
148
1
151
Of resemblance in the effects produced
154
Of the influence of lapse of time
160
CHAPTER VII
166
Section Pago 201
167
Illustrations of philosophic memory
172
Further directions for the improvement of the memory
179
Approval and illustrations of these views from Coleridge
185
Use of definitions and axioms in demonstrative reasoning
186
Rules relating to the practice of reasoning 211
195
Of being influenced in reasoning by a love of the truth
196
Of differences in the power of reasoning
197
Consider the kind of evidence applicable to the subject
198
Reject the aid of false arguments or sophisms
199
Fallacia equivocationis or the use of equivocal terms and phrases
201
Of adherence to our opinions
202
Effects on the mind of debating for victory instead of truth CHAPTER XIII
203
Imagination an intellectual rather than a sensitive process
204
The imagination closely related to the reasoning power
205
Definition of the power of imagination
206
Process of the mind in the creations of the imagination
207
Further remarks on the same subject
208
Illustration from the writings of Dr Reid
209
Grounds of the preference of one conception to another
210
Illustration of the subject from Milton
211
The creations of imagination not entirely voluntary
212
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
213
On the utility of the faculty of the imagination
214
Importance of the imagination in connexion with reasoning
215
225
225
DISORDERED INTELLECTUAL ACTION 1 EXCITED CONCEPTIONS OR APPARITIONS 216 Disordered intellectual action as connected with t...
231
Of excited conceptions and of apparitions in general 218 Of the less permanent excited conceptions of sight
232
Of the less permament excited conceptions of sound 220 First cause of permanently vivid conceptions or apparitions Morbid sensibility of the retina ...
235
CHAPTER XV
244
232
249
Disordered or alienated association Lightheadedness
250
235
251
Insanity or alienation of the power of belief
256
PART II
261
PART I
267
EMOTIONS OF BEAUTY
273
Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
279
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
286
Explanation of the beauty of motion from Kaimes
292
271
294
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human
298
colours in connexion with the sublime
304
Occasions of emotions of the ludicrous
310
CLASS II
318
Desires always imply an object desired
324
Of the natural desire of esteem
328
Instances of instincts in the human mind
330
Of the moral character of the desire of power
334
CHAPTER IV
336
Other illustrations of the existence of this principle
340
Practical results of the principle of imitation
342
CHAPTER V
358
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
365
CHAPTER VI
371
Illustrations of the filial affection
377
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
383
Of patriotism or love of country
389
Section
395
Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle
401
390
405
Of the origin of secondary active principles
408
Classification of the moral sensibilities
414
391
416
INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTERNAL ORIGIN
419
Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning
420
Further proof from language and literature
426
Feelings of obligation differ from those of mere approval and dis
429
Diversities in moral decisions dependent on differences in
436
CHAPTER V
442
THE SENSIBILITIES OR SENSITIVE NATURE
449
Disordered action of imitativeness or the principle of imitation
456
Familiar instances of sympathetic imitation
462
Insanity of the affections or passions
468
CHAPTER IV
475

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Strana 240 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Strana 301 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Strana 101 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Strana 180 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Strana 308 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.
Strana 118 - This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself; and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense...
Strana 160 - Time but the impression stronger makes, As streams their channels deeper wear.
Strana 106 - IN Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round : And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots...
Strana 225 - Invention is one of the great marks of genius ; but if we consult experience we shall find, that it is by being conversant with the inventions of others that we learn to invent, as by reading the thoughts of others we learn to think.

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