A Complete History of England: From the Descent of Julius Caesar, to the Treaty of Aix la Chapelle, 1748. Containing the Transactions of One Thousand Eight Hundred and Three Years, Zväzok 10

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J. Rivington and J. Fletcher, at the Oxford-Theatre, 1759
 

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Strana 271 - Aislabie, the evidence appeared so strong against him, that the commons resolved, he had promoted the destructive execution of the South Sea scheme, with a view to his own exorbitant profit, and combined with the directors in their pernicious practices, to the ruin of public credit.
Strana 55 - British arms, won so many battles, subdued such a number of towns and districts, humbled the pride and checked the ambition of France, secured the liberty of Europe, and, as it were, chained victory to his chariot wheels, was in a few weeks dwindled into an object of contempt and derision.
Strana 395 - ... after they had murdered their little infant. This wretched pair were in the month of April found hanging in their bedchamber, at about a yard's distance from each other ; and in a separate apartment the child lay dead in a cradle.
Strana 182 - Even since the queen's death, addresses were prepared in different parts of Scotland against the union, which was deemed a national grievance ; and the jacobites did not fail to encourage this aversion.
Strana 192 - Evans's dragoons, and drove them two miles before him, as far as the water of Allan : yet in that space they wheeled, about, and attempted to rally ten times ; so that he was obliged to press them hard, that they might not recover from, their confusion. Brigadier...
Strana 111 - The loss of the British forces was soon severely felt in the allied army. Villars attacked a separate body of their troops, encamped at Denain, under the command of the earl of Albemarle. Their intrenchments were forced, and seventeen battalions either killed or taken. The earl himself, and all the surviving officers, were made prisoners. Five...
Strana 237 - ... of his arms, that court had lately given orders at all the ports of Spain and of the West Indies to fit out privateers against the English.
Strana 194 - The pretender having been amused with the hope of seeing the whole kingdom of England rise up as one man in his behalf; and the duke of Ormond having made a fruitless voyage to the western coast, to try the disposition of the people, he was now convinced of the vanity of his expectation in that quarter ; and, as he knew not what other course to take, he resolved to hazard his person among his friends in Scotland,' at a time when his affairs in that kingdom were absolutely desperate.
Strana 192 - The Earl of Mar advanced within two miles of his camp, and remained till daybreak in order of battle ; his army consisting of nine thousand effective men, cavalry as well as infantry. In the morning the duke, understanding they were in motion, drew up his forces, which did not exceed three thousand five hundred men, on the heights to the north-east of Dumblaine ; but he was outflanked both on the right and left.
Strana 191 - Muscovy, he resolved to pass the Forth, in order to join his southern friends, that they might march together into England. With this view he advanced to Auchterarder, where he reviewed his army, and rested on the eleventh day of November. The duke of Argyle...

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