Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind

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D. Appleton, 1898 - 400 strán (strany)
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Strana 287 - In all things, to serve from the lowest station upwards is necessary. To restrict yourself to a trade is best. For the narrow mind, whatever he attempts is still a trade; for the higher an art; and the highest, in doing one thing, does all; or, to speak less paradoxically, in the one thing which he does rightly, he sees the likeness of all that is done rightly.
Strana 213 - As to the first question, we may observe, that what we call a mind, is nothing but a heap or collection of different perceptions, united together by certain relations, and supposed, though falsely, to be endowed with a perfect simplicity and identity.
Strana 24 - Or if it is the true self which thinks, what other self can it be that is thought of? Clearly, a true cognition of self implies a state in which the knowing and the known are one — in which subject and object are identified; and this Mr. Mansel rightly holds to be the annihilation of both.
Strana 213 - The difference betwixt these consists in the degrees of force and liveliness with which they strike upon the mind and make their way into our thought or consciousness. Those perceptions which enter with most force and violence we may name impressions ; and under this name I comprehend all our sensations, passions, and emotions, as they make their first appearance in the soul.
Strana 208 - The mental act in which self is known, implies, like every other mental act, a perceiving subject and a perceived object. If, then, the object perceived is self, what is the subject that perceives ? or if it is the true self which thinks, what other self can it bo that is thought of...
Strana 364 - But opposed to this oriental idea, the Greek religion made beauty the essential feature of the idea of the divine, and hence his art is created as an act of worship of the beautiful. It represents the supreme attainment of the world in pure beauty, because it is pure beauty and nothing beyond. Christianity reaches beyond beauty to holiness. Other heathen religions fall short of the Greek idea and lack an essential element which the Greek religion possessed. The Greeks believed that the divine is...
Strana 142 - ... is it not evident that if the, child is at any epoch of his long period of helplessness inured into any habit or fixed form of activity belonging to a lower stage of development the tendency will be to arrest growth at that standpoint and make it difficult or next to impossible to continue the growth of the child into higher and more civilized forms of soul activity?
Strana v - Psychology is too frequently only an inventory of certain so-called " faculties of the mind," such as the five senses, imagination, conception, reasoning, etc. And teachers have been offered such an inventory under the name of " educational psychology." It has been assumed that education has to do with " cultivating the faculties." Perhaps the analogy of the body has been taken as valid for the soul, and, inasmuch as we can train this or that muscle, it is inferred that we can cultivate this or that...
Strana 212 - ALL THE perceptions of the human mind resolve themselves into two distinct kinds, which I shall call impressions and ideas. The difference betwixt these consists in the degrees of force and liveliness with which they strike upon the mind and make their way into our thought or consciousness. Those perceptions which enter with most force and violence we may name impressions; and under...

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