The Temple of the Goddess Coventina at Procolitia, Northumberland

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AA. Reid, 1878 - 45 strán (strany)
 

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Strana 28 - O fons Bandusiae, splendidior vitro, dulci digne mero non sine floribus, cras donaberis haedo, cui frons turgida cornibus primis et venerem et proelia destinat. frustra : nam gelidos inficiet tibi rubro sanguine rivos lascivi suboles gregis.
Strana 4 - Wall standing to the height of six or seven feet, and the remains of one of the turrets, which it is said were placed along the Wall at the distance of 300 yards from each other, and which, with this exception, have been annihilated through the whole length of the Wall. Within the distance of a mile from the Tower-Tay Hill is reached the summit of the Limestone Bank, on which will be found the remains of gigantic Roman works, and from which there open two most magnificent views, one on the right...
Strana 7 - Life of Agricola," cap. xxxvi. holding a flagon from which is poured a stream of water, and by the existence of a well or reservoir for water within the walls of her temple. "Whether the goddess Coventina was a British goddess, or a goddess imported by the Roman soldier, is a question not easily decided, nor can any satisfactory derivation be found for her name. She was probably a local deity to whose name a Roman termination has been given, as in the case of the god of the Brigantes Cocidius, for...
Strana 27 - The ruin of Paganism, in the age of Theodosius, is perhaps the only example of the total extirpation of any ancient and popular superstition; and may therefore deserve to be considered as a singular event in the history of the human mind.
Strana 7 - ... poured a stream of water, and by the existence of a well or reservoir for water within the walls of her temple. "Whether the goddess Coventina was a British goddess, or a goddess imported by the Roman soldier, is a question not easily decided, nor can any satisfactory derivation be found for her name. She was probably a local deity to whose name a Roman termination has been given, as in the case of the god of the Brigantes Cocidius, for whose name we do not attempt to find a derivation. It has...
Strana 4 - The building on the fort is chiefly on the west side, where about a year ago they discovered a well. It is a good spring, and the receptacle for the water is about seven...
Strana 4 - AD 400. This tablet is inscribed to a goddess whose name is unrecorded on the roll of Roman divinities. On it the goddess is represented as floating on the leaf of a gigantic water lily, and waving in her right hand a branch of palm or of some other tree. On one of the altars, described below, she is called Dea Nympha, and it is therefore clear that this goddess was a water deity, which is confirmed by the representation of her attendants on the sculpture here...
Strana 35 - ... the objects deposited. In the absence of positive proof the date and circumstances of the fate of the Temple of Coventina can only be matter of conjecture. So far our conjecture has been founded on the precedent of the fate of the Temple of the goddess Sequana. The peculiar position of the Temple of Coventina, under shelter of the fortress of Procolitia, on the line of defence against an aggressive foe, renders it not improbable that the deposition in the well as a place of safety may have been...
Strana 15 - ... Cubernorum Aurelius Campestris (?) The lettering of the first four lines of this inscription is good; that of the three last confused. The First Cohort of the Cugerni, or Cuberni, a people of Belgic Gaul, was one of the auxiliary cohorts serving in Britain in the Roman army. It was in Britain in the times of Trajan and Hadrian, and is included in the diplomas of citizenship granted by these emperors ; it was in Scotland at the time of the building of the Antonine wall there, as appears from an...
Strana 10 - It would appear from this inscription that the dedicator made the vase with his own hands. Whatever may be thought of the skill of Saturninus Gabinius as a manufacturer, his orthography is palpably defective. He gives to the goddess the title of Augusta, for which several precedents exist in the Nympheum, or Temple of the Water Deities at Nismes, the goddess addressed being styled Nympha Augusta. The inscription on the vase No. 2 is a barbarous abbreviation of the inscription on vase No. 1 ; and,...

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