Vergil, Aeneid 10: With Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, Zväzok 10

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Clarendon Press, 1991 - 303 strán (strany)
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The tenth book of Vergil's Aeneid contains some of the poem's most dramatic war narrative and yet has been unjustly neglected by Vergilian scholars. Making the text accessible to the modern reader, this book provides a full introduction examining the literary aspects of Aeneid 10, notes on the text and translation, a discussion of the major interpretational problems of the Aeneid raised in Book 10, and a facing English translation of the text for those with little or no knowledge of Latin. The first major commentary to deal exclusively with Book 10, this work will be invaluable to all interested in the great Roman epic. -- Amazon.com.

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NOTE ON TEXT AND TRANSLATION
1
Haemonides 537
7
COMMENTARY
57
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O tomto autorovi (1991)

Virgil was born on October 15, 70 B.C.E., in Northern Italy in a small village near Mantua. He attended school at Cremona and Mediolanum (Milan), then went to Rome, where he studied mathematics, medicine and rhetoric, and finally completed his studies in Naples. He entered literary circles as an "Alexandrian," the name given to a group of poets who sought inspiration in the sophisticated work of third-century Greek poets, also known as Alexandrians. In 49 BC Virgil became a Roman citizen. After his studies in Rome, Vergil is believed to have lived with his father for about 10 years, engaged in farm work, study, and writing poetry. After the battle of Philippi in 42 B.C.E. Virgil¿s property in Cisalpine Gaul, was confiscated for veterans. In the following years Virgil spent most of his time in Campania and Sicily, but he also had a house in Rome. During the reign of emperor Augustus, Virgil became a member of his court circle and was advanced by a minister, Maecenas, patron of the arts and close friend to the poet Horace. He gave Virgil a house near Naples. Between 42 and 37 B.C.E. Virgil composed pastoral poems known as Bucolic or Eclogues and spent years on the Georgics. The rest of his life, from 30 to 19 B.C., Virgil devoted to The Aeneid, the national epic of Rome, and the glory of the Empire. Although ambitious, Virgil was never really happy about the task. Virgil died in 19 B. C.

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