History of England, by Hume and Smollett; with a continuation by T.S. Hughes

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Strana 212 - ... only as a job, to gratify the rapacious retainers to the government, and their emissaries in that country. After a warm debate, however, it was adopted by a great majority, and obtained the royal assent.
Strana 430 - An Act for amending explaining and reducing into one Act of Parliament the laws relating to the government of his Majesty's ships vessels and forces by sea...
Strana 287 - ... kingdoms; he now found it necessary to acquaint the house of commons, that the present situation of affairs made it requisite to augment his forces by sea and land, and to take such other measures as might best tend to preserve the general peace of Europe, and to secure the just rights and possessions of his crown in America, as well as to repel any attempts whatsoever that might be made to support or countenance any designs which should be formed against his majesty and his kingdoms; and his...
Strana 409 - Kent, in common-council assembled. At the same time remonstrances were offered by the protestant dissenting ministers of the three denominations in and about the cities of London and Westminster ; by the protestant dissenters of Shrewsbury; the dissenting ministers of Devonshire ; the protestant dissenters, being freeholders and burgesses of the town and county of the town of Nottingham, joined with other inhabitants of the church of England, expressing their apprehension, that, in the bill then...
Strana 107 - ... their advanced guards : the sergeant who commanded it immediately turned out his men, and their pieces were presented when the earl first perceived them : without betraying the least mark of disorder, he rode up to the sergeant...
Strana 436 - I shall be considered, as I now perceive myself, a victim destined to divert the indignation and resentment of an injured and deluded people from the proper objects : my enemies themselves must now think me innocent.
Strana 210 - Nothing could be more salutary than the purposes of these regulations : the suburbs of the metropolis abounded with an incredible number of public houses, which continually resounded with the noise of riot and intemperance ; they were the haunts of idleness, fraud, and rapine, and the seminaries of drunkenness, debauchery, extravagance, and every vice incident to human nature...
Strana 278 - At length, however, he surrendered the fort upon capitulation, for the performance of which he left two officers as hostages in the hands of the French ; and in his retreat was terribly harassed by the Indians, who plundered his baggage, and massacred his people. This event was no sooner known in England, than the British ambassador at Paris received directions to complain of it to the French ministry, as an open violation of the peace ; but this representation had no effect.
Strana 168 - ... alleging, that as he (the emperor) received no part of it, the payment was illegal. Mr. Latton refusing to comply with this arbitrary demand, his house was surrounded by a detachment of soldiers, who violently dragged his secretary from his presence, and threw him into a dismal subterranean dungeon, where he continued twenty days. The English slaves, to the number of twenty-seven, were condemned to the same fate : the ambassador himself was degraded from his character, deprived of his allowance,...
Strana 77 - Auchmuty, judge-advocate of the court of Admiralty in New England. He demonstrated that the reduction of Cape Breton would put the English in sole possession of the fishery of North America, which would annually return to Great Britain two millions sterling for the manufactures yearly shipped to the...

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