The Principles of International Law

Predný obal
Heath, 1895 - 681 strán (strany)

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Causes of the vast influence exercised by Grotius The Grotian version of Nature and Natural Law The theory of a Law of Nature criticised Its connect...
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38
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THE SUBJECTS OF INTERNATIONAL
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60
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Only the more civilized sovereign states are subjects of Inter national
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Statelife and its continuity The different kinds of confed erations
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The treatment accorded to enemy subjects found in a state
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Other unions between states 47 International Law deals only with cases where there is a division of the powers of external sovereignty 48 The Great P...
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Communities under a suzerain
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The idea of a common superior disappeared at the Reforma
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Members of a system of confederated states 62 Permanently neutralized states
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Civilized belligerent communities not being states
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Corporations both ordinary and privileged 55 V Individuals
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Admission of new subjects of International Law 57 1 States hitherto accounted barbarous
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2 States formed by civilized men in hitherto uncivilized countries
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THE SOURCES AND DIVISIONS OF INTERNATIONAL
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For a time there was grave danger of utter lawlessness
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The various methods of recognition of independence
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27
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CHAPTER II
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Rules of precedence for states and their representatives
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Intervention based upon grounds of humanity
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1 Occupation
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Importance of the conception of territorial sovereignty
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Extent of territory gained by occupation
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2 Cession
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Declass of we are not necessa
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A state may exercise power over territory as A PROTECTORATE
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Ancient and modern ideas of the violence permissible in
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RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS CONNECTED WITH JURISDICTION
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This change in ideas was brought about by the work
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International questions connected with naturalization
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Influences which made for improvement during the Middle
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The extent to which public vessels of the enemy are liable
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145
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The history of the rules of ordinary maritime capture
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Consuls Their position and immunities
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The treatymaking power Ratification of treaties
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PART III
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The value and admissibility of these anomalous measures
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The question whether it can be given to a fleet acting with
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out a land base of operations 165 The immediate legal effeets of the oute
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BECTION
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Table showing the effect of war on treaties
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Noncombatant subjects of the enen
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Rules for determining domicil in relation to questions of bellig
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The special case of stock held by enemy subjects in the public
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The Declaration of Paris
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Summary of the circumstances under which enemy character
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The claim that neutral vessels under convoy are exempt from
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CHAPTER VI
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1 Flags of truce 2 Cartels 3 Passports and safeconducts
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4 Licenses to trade
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6 Capitulations
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6 Truces and armistices
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VIII
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PEACE AND THE MEANS OF PRESERVING PEACE 457
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War is usually terminated by a treaty of peace 239 The legal consequences of the restoration of peace 240 The simultaneous growth in modern times ...
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IV
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Definition of neutrality The elements out of which the Law of Neutrality has been formed 244 The history of neutrality
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Instances of true neutralization examined 247 The special case of neutralized portions of unneutralized
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states
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The nature and history of blockade
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The divisions of the Law of Neutrality
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A belligerent state ought 1 To refrain from carrying on hostil
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The measure of due diligence
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Two attempts to solve
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The doctrine of continuous voyages and its application to breach
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What articles are contraband of war?
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The penalty for unneutral service and the essentials of liability
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203
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642
549
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Strana 355 - ... fortunes and their own at the end of the fifteenth, and the beginning of the sixteenth centuries in all the courts of western Europe.
Strana 543 - But there is nothing in our laws, or in the law of nations, that forbids our citizens from sending armed vessels, as well as munitions of war, to foreign ports for sale. It is a commercial adventure which no nation is bound to prohibit, and which only exposes the persons engaged in it to the penalty of confiscation.
Strana 286 - that it is an essential principle of the law of nations that no power can liberate itself from the engagements of a treaty, nor modify the stipulations thereof, unless with the consent of the contracting powers by means of an amicable arrangement.
Strana 546 - First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruis* or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
Strana 181 - Labrador ; but so soon as the same, or any portion thereof, shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such portion so settled, without previous agreement for such purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground.
Strana 582 - Commander of one of the blockading vessels, who will endorse on her register the fact and date of such warning, and if the same vessel shall again attempt to enter or leave the blockaded port, she will be captured and sent to the nearest convenient port, for such proceedings against her and her cargo as prize as may be deemed advisable.
Strana 395 - Majesty's ships of war any right or claim in or to any ship or goods taken as prize or the proceeds thereof, it being the intent of this Act that such officers and crews shall continue to take only such interest (if any) in the proceeds of prizes as may be from time to time granted to them by the Crown...
Strana 42 - I saw prevailing throughout the Christian world a license in making war of which even barbarous nations would have been ashamed, recourse being had to arms for slight...
Strana 547 - ... carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace ; and also to use like diligence to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such vessel having been specially adapted, in whole or in part, within such jurisdiction, to warlike use.
Strana 417 - ... so with intermitting returns to their homes and avocations, or with the occasional assumption of the semblance of peaceful pursuits, divesting themselves of the character or appearance of soldiers — such men, or squads of men, are not public enemies, and therefore, if captured, are not entitled to the privileges of prisoners of war, but shall be treated summarily as highway robbers or pirates.

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