History of Civilization in England, Zväzok 2

Predný obal
Parker, Son, and Bourn, 1861

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Summary of the most important distinctions between induction
58
Nothing can weaken superstition but knowledge
62
Decline of manufactures and of population and increase
77
The municipal element being thus imperfect the only ally which
80
Who endeavoured to improve the country by weakening
89
Government attempted to remedy this ignorance by calling
98
All this was promoted by the authority and high character
106
But it was of no avail because politicians can do nothing when
123
Inasmuch however as these ameliorations were opposed to
130
Continuation of the same policy by Charles V and by Philip II 1925
145
Their affection for him was the result of general causes which
151
CHAPTER II
157
The result was that all mirth all innocent gaiety all demonstra
162
CONDITION OF SCOTLAND DURING THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTI
164
Irish invasion of Scotland
165
Norwegian invasion of Scotland
173
set
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CHAPTER III
197
Power of the Douglases who were at the head of the southern
206
The nobles revenged themselves by becoming Reformers
212
As the nobles took the opposite side and as the people had no
216
In 1603 the King of Scotland became also King of England
217
But circumstances made hinı inductive and he collected facts
224
While Knox was abroad the nobles established the Reformation
227
In 1637 the reaction declared itself and in 1638 the bishops were
232
Thereupon the Protestant preachers said that the nobles were
236
The first manifestation of this rebellious spirit was the attack
242
Struggle between the upper classes and the clergy respecting
261
The movement being essentially democratic could not stop there
278
In 1688 another reaction in which the Scotch again freed them
293
The only powerful friends of this bad government were
294
Their religious illiberality was the result of the immense power pos
331
Black therefore did immense service by giving free scope to
339
Hence in the seventeenth century secular interests were
341
The clergy becoming elated indulge in language of extraordinary
357
The clergy to intimidate the people and bring them completely
366
They moreover declared that harmless and even praiseworthy
383
CHAPTER VI
410
This is well worthy of notice because the inductive method being
417
Its method
418
national character than the teaching of a deductive philo
427
His deductive method depended upon a suppression of premisses 432437
432
His Natural History of Religion
469
Reids philosophy
477
But this sort of progress depending too much upon individuals
483
Opposition between the method of Reid and that of Bacon 485486
485
His method was deductive and does not come under any of
496
He derived great aid from poetry
510
In this respect Scotland is similar to Germany but dissimilar
516
The action of fire and water on the crust of the earth may
519
Watts invention of the steamengine and discovery of the com
527
Assuming however for the purposes of classification that
533
Cullens theory of the solids
542
His nosology
548
His natural disposition was towards deduction
554
By this means he made a large number of curious physiological
556
He recognized the great truth that the sciences of the inorganic
563
But his English contemporaries being eminently inductive so dis
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AN EXAMINATION OF THE SCOTCH INTELLECT DURING
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Notwithstanding this difference the deductive method was
579
The Scotch literature of the eighteenth century being essentially
584
The notions countenanced there respecting the origin of epidemics
598

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