The Abolitionist Legacy: From Reconstruction to the NAACP

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Princeton University Press, 1995 - 438 strán (strany)

Building on arguments presented in The Struggle for Equality, James McPherson shows that many abolitionists did not retreat from Reconstruction, as historical accounts frequently lead us to believe, but instead vigorously continued the battle for black rights long after the Civil War. Tracing the activities of nearly 300 abolitionists and their descendants, he reveals that some played a crucial role in the establishment of schools and colleges for southern blacks, while others formed the vanguard of liberals who founded the NAACP in 1910. The author's examination of the complex and unhappy fate of Reconstruction clarifies the uneasy partnership of northern and southern white liberals after 1870, the tensions between black activists and white neo-abolitionists, the evolution of resistance to racist ideologies, and the origins of the NAACP.

 

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The abolitionist legacy: from Reconstruction to the NAACP

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These volumes, published in 1975 and 1964, respectively, chronicle the abolitionist movement from before the Civil War to the part it played in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. LJ's reviewer found The Abolitionist Legacy an "ably researched, well-written book" (LJ 12/15/75). Čítať celú recenziu

Obsah

Unfinished Task The Civil Rights Act of 1875
13
Reconstruction Reconfirmed? The Election of 1872
24
Reconstruction Unravels 18731876
35
Time Education and Bootstraps
53
The Compromise of 1877
81
Crosscurrents and Confusion 18771880
95
The New South
107
Goodbye to the Bloody Shirt
121
Berea College
244
The Struggle for Black Control
262
The Revival of Militancy
297
The Shattering of Hope
299
Womens Rights and AntiImperialism
318
History and Biology
333
Booker T Washington and the Reaffirmation of Gradualism
354
The Rejection of Gradualism and the Founding of the NAACP
368

Education for Freedom
141
The Roots of Freedmens Education
143
Between Black and White Puritans in Babylon
161
Paternalism and Piety
184
Detour or Mainstream? The Curriculum of Missionary Schools
203
The Segregation Issue
224
Abolitionists on Whom This Book Is Based
395
Southern Negro Colleges and Secondary Schools Established by Northern Mission Societies
409
A Note on Sources
417
Index
423
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Strana x - Negroes in their place, but to raise them out of the defilement of the places where slavery had wallowed them. The colleges they founded were social settlements; homes where the best of the sons of the freedmen came in close and sympathetic touch with the best traditions of New England. They lived and ate together, studied and worked, hoped and harkened in the dawning light.

O tomto autorovi (1995)

James M. McPherson is Professor of History at Princeton University. His many books include the Pulitzer Prize-winning Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, as well as What They Fought For, 1861-1865; Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution; Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction; and The Negro's Civil War: How American Negroes Felt and Acted during the War for the Union.

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