Modern Painters: pt. 3. Of the imaginative and theoretic faculties. 4th ed

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Smith, Elder, and Company, 1848
 

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Of the Theoretic Faculty as concerned with Pleasures of Sense 1 Explanation of the term theoretic
11
Use of the terms temperate and intemperate
12
Grounds of inferiority in the pleasures which are subjects of intemperance
13
Evidence of higher rank in pleasures of sight and hearing
14
Ideas of beauty how essentially moral
15
How degraded by heartless reception
16
Of Accuracy and Inaccuracy in Impressions of Sense 1 By what test is the health of the perceptive faculty to be determined ?
18
And in what sense may the terms right and wrong he attached to its conclusions ?
19
What power we have over impressions of sense
20
What duty is attached to this power over impressions of sense
21
Errors induced by the power of habit
22
The large scope of matured judgment
23
The danger of a spirit of choice
24
How certain conclusions respecting beauty are by reason demonstrable
25
The term Beauty how limitable in the outset Divided into Typical and Vital
26
Of False Opinions held concerning Beauty 1 Of the false opinion that Truth is beauty and vice versa
28
The twofold operation of custom It deadens Sensation but confirms Affection
29
But never either creates or destroys the essence of Beauty
30
Of the false opinion that Beauty depends on the association of ideas
31
Association Accidental The extent of its influence
32
The Dignity of its function
33
And what caution it renders necessary in the examination of them
34
Of Typical Beauty First of Infinity or the Type of Divine Incomprehensibility 1 Impossibility of adequately treating the subject
36
The Child instinct respecting space
37
Continued in after life
38
Infinity how necessary in art
39
Conditions of its necessity
40
How the dignity of treatment is proportioned to the expression of infinity
41
Among the Venetians
42
Other modes in which the power of infinity is felt
43
The Beauty of Gradation
44
How necessary in Art
45
Infinity not rightly implied by vastness
46
Of Unity or the Type of the Divine Comprehen siveness 1 The general conception of divine Unity
47
The several kinds of Unity Subjectional Original Of Sequence and of Membership
49
Variety Why required
50
The love of change How morbid and evil
51
The conducing of variety towards Unity of Subjection
52
And towards Unity of Sequence
53
The value of Apparent Proportion in Curvature
56
How produced in natural forms
57
Error of Burke in this matter
58
Constructive proportion Its influence in plants
59
And animals
60
Of Repose or the Type of Divine Permanence 1 Universal feeling respecting the necessity of repose in art Its sources
61
Repose how expressed in matter
62
Mental repose How noble
63
Its universal value as a test of art
64
And in altar tombs
66
Of Symmetry or the Type of Divine Justice 1 Symmetry what and how found in organic nature
68
To what its agreeableness is referable Various instances
69
Of Purity or the Type of Divine Energy 1 The Influence of Light as a sacred Symbol
71
Originally derived from conditions of Matter
72
The Beauty of Curvature 43
73
Energy how expressed by purity of Matter
74
Spirituality how so expressed
75
Of Moderation or the Type of Government by Law 1 Meaning of the terms Chasteness and Refinement
76
Finish by great masters esteemed essential
77
Moderation its nature and value
78
It is the girdle of Beauty
79
How difficult of attainment yet essential to all good
80
General Inferences respecting Typical Beauty 1 The subject incompletely treated yet admitting of general conclusions
81
Typical Beauty not created for mans sake
82
Of Vital Beauty First as Relative 1 Transition from typical to vital Beauty
84
The perfection of the Theoretic faculty as concerned with vital Beauty is Charity
85
Only with respect to plants less affection than sympathy
86
Which is proportioned to the appearance of Energy in the Plants
87
This sympathy is unselfish and does not regard utility
88
Especially with respect to animals
89
The second perfection of the Theoretic faculty as concerned with life is justice of moral judgment
90
How impeded
91
PAGE
92
As also in Plants
93
Of Vital Beauty Secondly as Generic 1 The beauty of fulfilment of appointed function in every animal
95
The two senses of the word Ideal Either it refers to action of the imagination
96
Or to perfection of type
97
Of Ideal form First in the lower animals
98
Ideal form in vegetables
99
Admits of variety in the Ideal of the former
100
Instance in the Soldanella and Ranunculus
101
The beauty of repose and felicity how consistent with such Ideal
102
The ideality of Art
103
CHAPTER XIVOf Vital Beauty Thirdly in Man 1 Condition of the human creature entirely different from that of the lower animals
105
How the conception of the bodily ideal is reached
106
Modifications of the bodily ideal owing to influence of mind First of Intellect
107
What beauty is bestowed by them
108
Secondly Sensuality
117
And prevented by its splendour
118
And Modern Art
119
Holy Fear how distinct from human Terror
120
Of passion generally
122
Recapitulation
123
General Conclusions respecting the Theoretic Faculty 1 There are no sources of the emotion of beauty more than those found in things visible
125
What imperfection exists in visible things How in a sort by imagination removeable
126
What objections may be made to this conclusion
127
How interrupted by false feeling
128
Greatness and truth are sometimes by the Deity sustained and spoken in and through Evil men
129
The second objection arising from the coldness of Christian men to ex ternal beauty
130
Reasons for this coldness in the anxieties of the world These anxieties overwrought and criminal
131
Theoria the Service of Heaven
132
SECTION II
133
The works of the Metaphysicians how nugatory with respect to this faculty
134
This instance nugatory
135
Various instances
136
The three operations of the Imagination Penetrative Associative Con templative
137
Of Imagination Associative 1 Of simple conception
138
How connected with Verbal knowledge
139
Characteristics of Composition
140
What powers are implied by it The First of the Three Functions of Fancy
141
Imagination associative is the corelative conception of imperfect com ponent parts
142
The grasp and dignity of Imagination
143
Its limits
144
How manifested in treatmentof uncertain relations Its deficiency illustrated
145
Laws of art the safeguard of the unimaginative
146
The monotony of unimaginative treatment
147
Imagination never repeats itself
148
Instances of absence of Imagination Claude Gaspar Poussin
149
Its presence Salvator Nicolo Poussin Titian Tintoret
150
The due function of Associative imagination with respect to nature
151
The sign of imaginative work is its appearance of absolute truth
152
Of Imagination Penetrative 1 Imagination penetrative is concerned not with the combining but appre hending of things
154
The imagination seizes always by the innermost point
155
It acts intuitively and without reasoning
156
Absence of imagination how shown
157
Fancy how involved with Imagination
159
Fancy is never serious
160
Fancy restless
161
And suggestive of the Imagination
162
Imagination addresses itself to Imagination
164
The Annunciation
165
The Baptism of Christ Its treatment by various painters
166
By Tintoret
167
The Crucifixion
168
The Massacre of Innocents
170
Various works in the Scuola di San Rocco
171
The Last Judgment How treated by various painters
172
The imaginative verity how distinguished from realism
173
The imagination how manifested in sculpture
174
Bandinelli Canova Mino da Fiesole
175
Recapitulation The perfect function of the Imagination is the intuitive perception of Ultimate Truth
178
Imagination how vulgarly understood
179
How its cultivation is dependent on the moral feelings
180
Of Imagination Contemplative 1 Imagination contemplative is not part of the essence but only a habit or mode of the faculty
182
Is not in itself capable of adding to the charm of fair things
183
But gives to the Imagination its regardant power over them
184
The third office of Fancy distinguished from imagination contemplative
185
Various instances
187
Morbid or Nervous Fancy
190
Except under narrow limits 1st Abstract rendering of form without colour
191
Or of both without texture
192
Abstraction or typical representation of animal form
193
Or in architectural decoration
194
Exception in delicate and superimposed ornament
195
Abstractions of things capable of varied accident are not imaginative
196
Exaggeration Its laws and limits First in scale of representation
197
Secondly Of things capable of variety of scale
198
Thirdly necessary in expression of characteristic features on diminished scale
199
Of the Superhuman Ideal 1 The subject is not to be here treated in detail
201
And these are in or through creature forms familiar to us
202
lst Of the expression of Inspiration
203
No representation of that which is more than creature is possible
204
Supernatural character expressed by modification of accessaries
205
Landscape of Benozzo Gozzoli
206
Such Landscape is not to be imitated
207
Colour And Decoration Their use in representations of the Super natural
208
And Colour pure
209
Anatomical development how far admissible
210
The influence of Greek art how dangerous
211
Conclusion
212
ADDENDA
215
VOL II
220
CONTENTS
2

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Strana 129 - And he took up his parable and said, Balaam the son of Beor hath said, and the man whose eyes are open hath said...
Strana 86 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals • Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Strana 34 - The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms were then to me An appetite ; a feeling and a love That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, or any interest Unborrowed from the eye.
Strana 124 - This seraph-band, each waved his hand: It was a heavenly sight! They stood as signals to the land, Each one a lovely light; This seraph-band, each waved his hand, No voice did they impart No voice; but oh!
Strana 136 - And missing thee, I walk unseen On the dry smooth-shaven green. To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon. Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.
Strana 136 - So spake the grisly terror, and in shape, So speaking: and so threatening, grew tenfold More dreadful and deform : on the other side, Incensed with indignation, Satan stood Unterrified, and like a comet burned, That fires the length of Ophiuchus huge In the arctic sky, and from his horrid hair Shakes pestilence and war.
Strana 37 - Not for these I raise The song of thanks and praise ; But for those obstinate questionings Of sense and outward things, Fallings from us, vanishings ; Blank misgivings of a Creature Moving about in worlds not realised...
Strana 166 - ... of its supporting column. This, I think, sufficiently explains the typical character of the whole. The ruined house is the Jewish dispensation ; that obscurely arising in the dawning of the sky is the Christian ; but the corner-stone of the old building remains, though the builder's tools lie idle beside it, and the stone which the builders refused is become the Headstone of the Corner.
Strana 4 - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time : also he hath set the world in their heart; so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
Strana 124 - That light proceeds, which kindleth lovers' fire, Shall never be extinguished nor decay; But, when the vital spirits do expire, Unto her native planet shall retire; For it is heavenly born and cannot die, Being a parcel of the purest sky.

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