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roar.] All this is wanting in the folio edition

of 1632.

Sc. 4. p. 395.

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Sly. I have no more shoes than feet, nay sometimes more feet than fooes; or such fooes, as my toes look through the over leather.]

Jasper Mayne (Amorous Warre, à tragi-comedy, act 3. sc. 6. p. 42.) has an image i noe unlike this. · Where Artops speaking of a company of soldiers, if I temember right, uses the following words.

Artops. “ This is most rare with reference " to the feathers in your hats; most pilfering " gentlemen ; which shows, that you have skir"mish'd with neighbouring poultry lately, and

having eaten part of your conquest, wear the “ rest as emblems, of wandering from the

camp, and inroads on backsides. If I may “ ask you, where have you learnt this elo

quence ? I do not read, that Demosthenes de“ claim'd with toes looking through leathern cafements; or that he was sent in an embassy “ with half a stockin; or such decay'd capa

risons, as I observe in your retinue.”
Act 1. sc. 3. p. 404. Gremio of Catharina.

Gremio. I say a devil, think’t thou Hortensio, tho?. her father be very rich, any man is so very a fool to be married to bell.]

Mr. Quarles in his play, intit'led, The Virk gin Widow; act 1. sc. I. has a similar passage.

" Maria's

24 Maria's louder tongue « Outroars the thunder, and her flaming eyes 66 Outsorches Ætna, her impetuous rage “ Out-devils the whole academy of hell.”

And Mr. Richard Brome. In his play, intit'led, The City Wit : or The Woman wears the Breeches, act 1. sc. I.

Jeremy. 'Tis nothing but her old disease " the tongue ague, whose fit is now got up to W such a height the devil cannot lay it.

" She will out-scoid ten carted bawds, even “ when she is fober; and out-chat fifteen mid" wives, tho' fourteen of them be half drunk.

George's advice to his master (in Tbe Gentleman of Venice, by Mr. James Shirley, act 5. p. 60.) was a very proper defence against the clamour of such a scolding wife. George. “ Master, look here.

, 11 « If you had but this hole to put your head in, ... it would be a great preservative to your hearsing, and keep all the noise of my dame's cul« verine within this fortification well lock'd up,

you would think her loudest scolding a meer “whisper."

Id. ib.
Hort.

Sweet Bianca ? happy man be bis dole. ] Dole used for lot, or portion, or division in Chaucer. Shakespeare has the fame expreffion, First Part of King Henry IV th, act 2. fc,

Poins.

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Falft. Now, my mafters, happy man be bis dole say I, every man to his business. The proverb,

happy man, happy dole; “ or happy man by his dole.

See Ray's Proverbial Sentences, p. 151. Act 1. sc. 3. p. 405.

Exeunt Gremio and Hortensio.] “ Exeunt ambo." Folio 1632.

Sc. 4. p. 405.

That art to me as secret, and as dear, As Anna to the Queen of Carthage was.] Anna fifter to Dido Queen of Carthage, was in love with Æneas. See Virgil's Æneids.

Sc. 7. p. 415.
Petruchio. Have I not in my time beard lions

roar ?
Have I not heard the sea puffod up with winds ?
Rage like an angry boar, chafed with sweat?
Have I not beard great ordnance in the field ?
And heav'ns artillery thunder in the skies?
Have I not in a pitched battle beard
Loud larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets clangue?
And do you tell me of a woman's tongue, &c.]

Mr. Philip Massenger in his tragi-comedy, intitled, The Bashful Lover, act 4. plays p. 55. has a passage not much unlike this.

Lorenzo. “I that have pass’d my youth “ Unscorch'd with wanton fires, my sole delight “ In glittering arms, my conquering sword my

mistress; - Neighing of barbed horse, the cries and groans “ Of vanquish'd foes suing for life, my musick;

" And

ks And shall I in the autumn of my age

" Suffer

my

self To be transform'd, and like a puling lover “ With arms thus folded up, eccho, Ay -- mes ?

And Mr. James Shirley in his tragi-comedy intitled, The Imposture, p. 61.

Pand. “Have I in thirty battles 'gainst the Turk “ Stood the dire shock, when the granadoes flew “ Like atomes in the sun. “ Have kill'd twenty Basbas, and a musulman, " And took the Sultan's turbant prisoner ; “ And shall I be affronted with a things “ Less than a Lance Presado ?

Sc. 7. p. 417. The presenters above speak bere.

1. Man. My Lord, you nod; you do not mind the play.

Sly. Yea, by Saint Ann, do I: a good matter surely! comes there any more of it ?

Lady. My Lord, 'tis but begun.

Sly. 'Tis a very excellent piece of work, madam Lady would'twere done.] Wanting in fol. 1632.

Act 2: sc. 4. p. 424.
Pet. You lie in faith, for you are callid plain

Kate,
And bonny Kate, and sometime Kate the curst,
But Kate, the prettiest Kate in Christendom,
Kate of Kate Hall, my super-dainty Kate, &c.]

The author of the comedy, intitled, Wily beguiled, seems to have borrowed from this paifage of Shakespeare; tho' William the Lover treats his mistress in a more courteous and complaisant manner.

0

Will.

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egge, brave Pegge, kind 194 Critical, Historical, and Explanatory Will

. Sweet (a) Pegge, honny Pegge, fine Pegge, comely Pegge, my nutting, my sweet* ing, my love, my dove, my hunny, my bun

ny, my ducke, my dear, my darling-grace
me with thy pleasant eyes, &c."
Sc. 5. p. 428.

And kiss me Kate, we will be married o* sunday.]
A sunday. Folio 1632~"We'll marry o' funday.
Sir Tho. Hanmer.
Sc. 6. p. 432

.
[The presenters above, Speak bere.]
Sly, Sim, when will the fool come again?
Sim. Anon, my Lord.

Sly. Give some more drink bere-- where's the tapster ? here Sim, eat some of these things.

Sim. So I do, my Lord.

Sly, Here Sim, I drink to thee.] Wanting in
Folio 1632.
Act 3. sc. I. p. 434.

Enter a servant.
Serv. Mistress, your father prays you leave your
books.] “Enter a Messenger,
Nicke. 'mistresse, & c." Folio 1632.

Enter Baptista, Gremio, Tranio, Catharina, Lucentio, Bianca, and attendants.] Biancha, and others, attendants, Folio 1632.

Sc. 3. p. 436.

Sc. 2.

(a) Paga a girl, a little wench. So used yet by the Danes. Hereof cometh our Northern name of Peg. Vero fegar, p. 250.

I

Bioni

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