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No.

Understanding, good, necessary in a scholar.....197, 244
Unnion and Valentine, story of.
Upholders, company of, their civility to Mr. Bicker-

5

staff...

................

122
.................... 99

99

Petition and proposals of.
Permitted to bury their dead..
Advertisement for the funeral of Dr. Partridge..... 99
Ipholster, the great newsmonger....
His early visit..

155
160

Much esteemed in alley coffee-houses.......................... 178
Carried to Bedlam

Letters of news from him...

178
160, 232
Urbanus, his modesty and condescension. ..................... 244
Vulgar, who to be accounted so...

69

.............................

........

...........

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WAGS, the lowest pretenders to wit................... 184
Waiting-maids, a petition from them................. 136
War, religious, discussed
War-horse to be let.....
Watch invented for the use of clubs...........

...............................

................ 155
64
264
.............................................2, 34
....................................... 257

Water, circumspection

203

Wax-work in Germany.
Wealth, a distinction only in traffic.
Wealthy persons fix characters and wit to circum-

stances...

Weather-glass, state
Wedlock, picture of.....
Welch a nation of gentlemen
Harp, an instrument in a female concert..........

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157
138, 141
129
38
5
114

7
$1

......

W

etters reproved...

Whigs, a religious order in England............
Whisperers, censured.....

Whitaker's, (admiral) arrival at Barcelona
Widowhood, male, considered
Wife, the most amiable term in life, and derided only
by fools

33

Scheme to govern one...

10

Infallible sign of wives loving their husbands....... 104
Wildair, (Tom) how reformed by his father.........
Wilks, the comedian, his excellencies.........

60

112

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Judged by men's purses

Wits opposed to critics..
Bodily wits

Professed wits, silly and troublesome....
Withers, (general) character of .....
Witchcraft described and explained.
Women have not the allowances men make for
themselves

The villany of deluding them exposed..
The happiness of mankind depends on their educa-
tion

.....

THE END

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Want regular education...

Natural to them to talk of themselves...
Of the present age, compared with those of the last
More subtle than men in their own affairs.....
Their common failing..............

Bad taste in dress

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Unmarried, instructions to them....
Wren, (sir Christopher) described under the name of
Nestor

XERXES, why he burst into tears.

YOUNG, (Margery) life and adventures of........

179

12

99

6%

57

251

57

99

45

219
44
21

90!

201

14.

61

:0

61

30

947

151

181

5-2

97

928

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THE

GUARDIAN;

COMPLETE

IN ONE VOLUME.

WITH

NOTES, AND A GENERAL INDEX.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY JONES AND CO.
TEMPLE OF THE MUSES (Late Lackington's), FINSBURY SQUARE;

AND MAY BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLERS.

1829.

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ORIGINAL DEDICATIONS.

Volume the First.

ΤΟ

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL CADOGAN.

SIR,
Ν

IN the character of Guardian, it behoves me

to do honour to such as have deserved well of society, and laid out worthy and manly qualities, in the service of the public. No man has more eminently distinguished himself this way, than Mr. Cadogan; with a contempt of pleasure, rest, and ease, when called to the duties of your grious profession, you have lived in a familiarity with dangers, and with a strict eye upon the final purpose of the attempt, have wholly disregarded what should befall yourself in the prosecution of. it; thus has life risen to you, as fast as you resigned it, and every new hour, for having so frankly lent the preceding moments to the cause of justice and of liberty, has come home to you, improved with honour: This happy distinction, which is so very peculiar to you, with the addition of industry, vigilance, patience of labour, thrist, and hunger, in common with the meanest soldier, has made your present fortune unenvied. For the public always reap greater ad

• Afterwards Earl of Bath.

vantage from the example of successful merit, than the deserving man himself can possibly be possessed of; your country knows how eminently you excel in the several parts of military skill, whether in assigning the encampment, accommodating the troops, leading to the charge, or pursuing the enemy: the retreat being the only part of the profession which has not fallen within the experience of those, who learned their warfare under the duke of Marlborough. But the true and honest purpose of this epistle is to desire a place in your friendship, without pretending to add any thing to your reputation, who, by your own gallant actions, have acquired that your name through all ages shall be read with honour, wherever mention shall be made of that illus trious captain,

I am, Sir,

Volume the Second.

ΤΟ

SIR,

THE greatest honour of human life, is to live well with men of merit; and I hope you will pardon me the vanity of publishing, by this means, my happiness in being able to name you among my friends. The conversation of

your most obedient,

MR. PULTENEY.*

and most humble servant, THE GUARDIAN

a gentleman, that has a refined taste of letters, and a disposition in which those letters found nothing to correct, but very much to exert, is a good fortune too uncommon to be enjoyed in silence. In others, the greatest business of learning is to weed the soil; in you, it had nothing else to do, but to bring forth fruit. Affability, complacency, and generosity of heart,

which are natural to you, wanted nothing from literature, but to refine and direct the application of them. After I have boasted I had some share in your familiarity, I know not how to do you the justice of celebrating you for the choice of an elegant and worthy acquaintance, with whom you live in the happy communication of generous sentiments, which contribute not only to your own mutual entertainment and improvement, but to the honour and service of your country. Zeal for the public good is the characteristic of a man of honour, and a gentleman, and must take place of pleasures, profits, and all other private gra. tifications. Whoever wants this motive, is an open enemy, or an inglorious neuter to mankind, in proportion to the misapplied advantages with which nature and fortune have blessed him. But you have a soul animated

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with nobler views, and know that the distinc-
tion of wealth and plenteous circumstances, is
a tax upon an honest mind, to endeavour, as
much as the occurrences of life will give him
leave, to guard the properties of others, and
be vigilant for the good of his fellow-subjects.

This generous inclination, no man possesses
in a warmer degree than yourself; which, that
heaven would reward with long possession o
that reputation into which you have made so
early an entrance, the reputation of a man of
sense, a good citizen, and agreeable companion,
a disinterested friend, and an unbiassed patriot,
is the hearty prayer of,

Sir,
your most obliged,
and most obedient,
bumble servant,
THE GUARDIAN

THE PUBLISHER TO THE READER.

'IT is a justice which Mr. Ironside owes gentlemen who have sent him their assistances from time to time, in the carrying on of this work, to acknowledge that obligation, though at the same time he himself dwindles into the character of a mere publisher, by making the acknowledgment. But whether a man does it out of justi or gratitude, or any other virtuous reason or not, it is also a prudential act to take no more upon a man than he can bear. But to my present purpose. The letter Too large a credit has made many a bankrupt, from Gnatho of the Cures performed by Flatbut taking even less than a man can answer tery, and that of comparing Dress to Criticism, with ease, is a sure fund for extending it when-are Mr. Gay's. Mr. Martin, Mr. Philips, ever his occasions require. All those papers | Mr. Tickell, Mr. Carey, Mr. Eusden, Mr. Ince, which are distinguished by the mark of a and M Hughes, have obliged the town with Hand, were written by a gentleman who has entertaining discourses in these volumes; and obliged the world with productions too sublime Mr. Berkeley, of Trinity College in Dublin, to admit that the author of them should re- has embellished them with many excellent ceive any addition to his reputation, from such arguments in honour of religion and virtue. loose occasional thoughts as make up these Mr. Parnell will I hope forgive me, that withlittle treatises; for which reason his name out his leave I mention, that I have seen his shall be concealed. Those which are marked hand on the like occasion. There are some with a Star, were composed by Mr. Budgell. discourses of a less pleasing nature which reThat upon Dedications, with the Epistle of an late to the divisions amongst us, and such (lest Author to Himself, the Club of little Men, any of these gentlemen should suffer from the Receipt to make an Epic Poem, the paper unjust suspicion,) I must impute to the right of the Gardens of Alcinous, and the Catalogue author of them, who is one Mr. Steele, of of Greens, that against Barbarity to Animals, Langunnor, in the county of Carmarthen, in and some others, have Mr. Pope for their South Wales. uthor. Now I mention this gentleman, 1

take this opportunity, out of the affection
I have for his person, and respect to his merit,
to let the world know, that he is now traus-
lating Homer's Iliad by subscription. He has
given good proof of his ability for the work,
and the men of greatest wit and learning of
this nation, of all parties, are, according to
their different abilities, zealous encouragers,
or solicitors for the work.

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