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ests of the work. As the Miscellany has become more extended in its circulation, these labours have increased, the subscribers are scattered over every part of the union, the difficulties of collection have been multiplied, and the chance of loss has become proportionally greater. In addition to this, we have been subject to a loss of no ordinary magnitude, by reason of the ill success with which our work has met in finding its way through the channel of the mail to its proper destination.. For causes, which we have not been able entirely to decypher, an unusual number of copies, in one direction or another, has habitually miscarried. These we have always renewed, when we have been informed of the failure. In short, we do not suppose, that any

of our subscribers will think us unreasonable in advancing the price of the Miscellany, when we assure them, that from a subscription list of nearly two thousand, we can hardly hope at the end of the present year to defray the full expense of the work to that period.

At the commencement of the next volume it will be necessary for the proprietors of the Miscellany to make such arrangements, as will enable them to allow a reasonable compensation for the labour and trouble of those who are engaged in conducting it. To meet this object, the subscription price, after the first of January next, will be two dollars a year. We give this timely notice, that any subscribers, who are not disposed to continue their subscription on these terms, may season. ably inform the agents. All names not withdrawn by the first of December will be understood as remaining for the next year.

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Unitarianism in the Hour of Death. We regret, that our orthodox friends are unwilling to let unitarianism stand or fall on its own merits, as a doctrine of scripture, but are perpetually insisting on its supposed consequences, and will not allow the public to come to an examination of its evidences, without first alarming and prejudicing them against it. We do not perceive the consistency of this with their constant cry, that every thing in the controversy between us, is to be settled by an appeal to the “law and the testimony." If, indeed, we must leave the Scriptures, it seems to us that the appeal had better be made to reason, than to the fears and prejudices of the people, especially when their fears and prejudices are in the first place to be excited by a misrepresentation of facts. It is always unsafe to condemn a doctrine for its supposed influence on the character, because the Inmuence of a doctrine on those, who really believe it, is seldom what its enemies suppose it would be on themselves in like circumstances. Besides, when the influence of unitarianism is misrepresented in matters of fact, we are often constrained to do what we alests of the work. As the Miscellany has become more extended in its circulation, these labours have increased, the subscribers are scattered over every part of the union, the difficulties of collection have been multiplied, and the chance of loss has become proportionally greater. In addition to this, we have been subject to a loss of no ordinary magnitude, by reason of the ill success with which our work has met in finding its way through the channel of the mail to its proper destination.. For causes, which we have not been able entirely to decypher, an unusual number of copies, in one direction or another, has habitually miscarried. These we have always renewed, when we have been informed of the failure. In short, we do not suppose, that any

of our subscribers will think us unreasonable in advancing the price of the Miscellany, when we assure them, that from a subscription list of nearly two thousand, we can hardly hope at the end of the present year to defray the full expense of the work to that period.

At the commencement of the next volume it will be necessary for the proprietors of the Miscellany to make such arrangements, as will enable them to allow a reasonable compensation for the labour and trouble of those who are engaged in conducting it. To meet this object, the subscription price, after the first of January next, will be two dollars a year. We give this timely notice, that any subscribers, who are not disposed to continue their subscription on these terms, may seasonably inform the agents. All names not withdrawn by the first of December will be understood as remaining

for the next year.

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Unitarianism in the Hour of Death. We regret, that our orthodox friends are unwilling to let unitarianism stand or fall on its own merits, as a doctrine of scripture, but are perpetually insisting on its supposed consequences, and will not allow the public to come to an examination of its evidences, without first alarming and prejudicing them against it. We do not perceive the consistency of this with their constant cry, that every thing in the controversy between us, is to be settled by an appeal to the “law and the testimony.” If, indeed, we must leave the Scriptures, it seems to us that the appeal had better be made to reason, than to the fears and prejudices of the people, especially when their fears and prejudices are in the first place to be excited by a misrepresentation of facts. It is always unsafe to condemn a doctrine for its supposed influence on the character, because the Inmuence of a doctrine on those, who really believe it, is seldom what its enemies suppose it would be on themselves in like circumstances. Besides, when the influence of unitarianism is misrepresented in matters of fact, we are often constrained to do what we always do with great reluctance; to contradict our opponents in such a manner as may imply them to be guilty of prevarication or falsehood. An assailant, however, must not complain of the rough treatment he may receive, if by his injudicious management of the controversy, he makes such treatment necessary to the defence of the injured party.

One measure, which the orthodox have adopted to prejudice the people against unitarianism, strikes us as peculiarly unfounded and unfair, though likely, no doubt, to produce a considerable effect on the timid and unreflecting. It is said of the system, that it will fail men in the hour of death; that it is a good and pleasant religion for the living, but a miserable and wretched one for the dying. “You unitarians live well,” said a zealous methodist to a friend, whose error he lamented, “but you do not die well.” We are offended at this objection, because we conceive it to be founded in error, both in point of principle and in point of fact.

Suppose it were true, that orthodoxy made men happier in death than unitarianism, would this establish its truth? We should remember, that if in this respect orthodoxy has the advantage of unitarianism, so then Mahometanism and the Runic superstitions have the advantage of orthodoxy. If men wish to die in a delirium of anticipated delights, they must not go to the Bible; no, not to the Bible as understood even by the orthodox, but to the Edda or the Koran. It is the nature of the doctrine believed in, not its truth, that determines its effect on the dying. Besides, who are the persons whom orthodoxy fills with transport in the dying hour? Generally speaking, are they good men

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