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WHEN LOVELY WOMAN STOOPS TO FOLLY

“ Lorsqu'une femme," Ségur
“When woman,” as Goldsmith declares, Barham
When Harry Brougham turns a Tory. Punch, 1844
When lovely woman wants a favour. Phæbe Carey,
When lovely woman, prone to folly. Punch, 1854
When lovely woman stoops. Diogenes, 1853
When lovely woman, hooped in folly. Punch, 1857
When lovely woman, lump of folly. S. Brooks ...
When managers have stooped to folly. Fun, 1866
When lovely woman takes to lollies. Grasshopper.
When lovely woman, still a maiden. Kottabos.
When lovely woman stoops to fashion.
When lovely woman takes to rinking
When lovely woman reads Le Follet. Figaro, 1873
When foolish man consents to marry
When lovely woman, once so jolly
When lovely woman finds that breaches
When lovely woman's melancholy. Fun, 1885
When lovely woman longs to marry
When stupid Odger stoops to folly. Judy
When foolish woman stoops to fashion. 1882
When man, less faithful than the colley. Judy.
If lovely woman seeks to enter. Gossip, 1885
When lovely woman pines in folly—1885...
When lovely woman stoops to Foli
When a grave Speaker stoops to folly

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Thomas Campbell—continued.
You rustic maids of England, Punch, 1857
Ye Commoners of England, Echoes from the

Clubs, 1867
You sneaking Skunks of England, Lyrics and

Lays, 1867
Ye Gentlemen of Ireland, Punch, 1870
Ye Scavengers of England, Punch, 1880 ...
Ye Milliners of England, Hugh Cayley, 1883
Ye Mariners of England (Torpedo Terrors)
Ye Infantry of England, Purich
Ye Gentlemen of England, Truth, 1884
Ye Mariners of England (and Mr. J. Chamberlain)

Funny Folks, 1884
Punch 1884

Globe, 1885
Ve Radicals of Brumm'gem, 1884...
Ve Gentlemen of England (Cricket Match)
Ye Shopkeepers of London, Truth, 1884...
Ye Ministers of England, Truth, 1879
You faithful Muggletonians...

Ye Mariners of England (on Chinese Sailors)
THE MAID'S REMONSTRANCE-

The Bench of Bishops. James Turner
Randolph's Remonstrance to Sir Stafford. H. L.

Brickel
Britannia’s Remonstrance. J. A. Elintt...

Staffy's Remonstrance. Gossamer...
THE EXILE OF ERIN

Parody from Figaro in London, May, 1833
Mitchell in Norfolk Island, The Puppet Show, 1848
The Ex-premier's Visit to Erin, 1877
Ireland's Distress, Captain Walford

Miss E. Chamberlayne
The Sorrows of Ireland. Rejected Odes, 1813...
Ye Mariners of England (as sung by Lord

Ellenborough), Punch, 1846
You Managers of Railways, Punch, 1847...
Ye Husbandmen of Scotland
Ye Liberals of England, Funny Folks, 1880
“There came to the beach a poor landlord of

Erin,M. O'Brien. The Irish Fireside,

1886
BATTLE OF THE Baltic

Battle of the Balls. The University Snowdrop.
Stanzas on a Late Battle
The Burning of the Play House 'Covent Garden.)

Shirley Brooks ...
“Of Scotia and the North." Rival Rhymes, 1859

The Escape of the Aldermen. Punch, 1845
THE LAST MAN-

The Last Growler. Punch, 1885...
The Last Duke. Punch, 1846
The Last Man in Town. Funny Folks, 1878

The Massacre of Glenho. Puck on Pegasus
THE PLEASURES OF HOPE.

Campbell, undone and outdone. Joseph G. Dalton
Portrait of Campbell. Maclise Portrait Gallery ...
Lines on Campbell. Dr. W. Maginn

AN ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF A Mad Dog

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AN ELEGY ON MRS. MARY BLAIZE

Le fameux la Galisse, by Gilles de Ménage, 1729
The Happy Man. The Mirror, 1823
Le Chanson de La Palice, by Bernard de la

Monnoye
John Smith, he was a guardsman bold. The Comic

Magazine, 1834
There was a man, so legends say. Tom Hood

An Elegy on Mrs. Grimes. The Century Magazine
DESCRIPTION OF AN AUTHOR'S BED CHAMBER

The Street Artist. The Month, 1851
THE DESERTED VILLAGE

The Doomed Village
The Deserted Village (London). The Tomahawk,
London in September. Lord John Russell
Innovation. Anthony Pasquin, 1786
The Frequented Village. E. Young

The Deserted School. James E. Thompson, 1885...
THE Hermit

“Gentle Herdsman tell to me"
The Friar of Orders Gray
The Hermit—a Prophetic Ballad. The St. James's

Gazette, 1881
The Hermit of Vauxhall, G. A. á Beckett, 1845 ...
RETALIATION

The Speaker's Dinner. Posihumous Parodies
Home, sweet Home. H. C. Bunner, 1881
The Tears of Genius. Courtney Melmoth, 1774

(Thomas Jackson Pratt)
The Vicar of Wakefield, and Olivia. W.G. Wills
The Vicar of Wide-a-Wakefield, or the Miss-

Terryous Uncle, a burlesque by H. P. Stephens

and W. Yardley
The Caste of the Burlesque
Jupiter and Mercury. David Garrick

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Mrs. F. D. Hemans.
The Stately HOMES OF ENGLAND

129
The Donkey-boys of England. Punch, 1849 129
The Garden Grounds of England

130
The Merchant Prince of England. Shirley Brooks 130
The dirty Cabs of London. Punch, 1853

130
The Duns of Merry England. Diogenes, 1853 131
The Barristers of England. Punch, 1853

131
The Compo'd Homes of England. The Figaro 131
The Stately Homes of England. Truth, 1877 132
The Cottage Homes of England. Punch, 1874... 132
The Haunted Homes of England. Pall Mall
Gazette, 1883

132
The Stately Men of England. Hugh Cayley 132
The Unhealthy Homes of England. Punch, 1884 133
Ye Cottage Homes of England. Truth, 1885 133
The Graves of a Household. The Man in the
Mocn

138
He never wrote again. Phæbe Carey, 1854

139
LEAVES HAVE THEIR TIME TO FALL.

Fish have their times to bite. College Rhymes 139
CASABIANCA

133
“Macbeth stood on the new-built Stage” (Mr.

Henry Irving as Macbeth.) The Figaro, 1875 134
"The Mule stood on the Steamboat Deck

134
“The boy stood on the back-yard fence'

134
“The dog lay on the butcher's stoop'

134
The Peer stood on the burning deck.” Truth, 1884 134
“ The girl steweci on the burning deck”

135
“ The boy stood by the stable door"

135
The Better LAND

135
"I've heard thee speak of a good hotel"

136
“I have heard you speak of “Three acres of

land.'Edward Walford, M A. Life, 1885 136
“I hear thee speak of a bit o' land

136
I hear thee speak of a ‘Plot of Land”

137
An answer to the preceding

137
“I hear thee speak of a Western land"

137
I hear them speak of a Happy Land.” Fun 138

“Three Tories went bravely." Grins and Groans
“ There were three pussy cats.” Fun. 1882
“Three Fishmongers looked for a sale." 1883...
“Three Potters set out all dressed in their best
“ Three Champions went stumping." Punch. 1884
Three Fossils sat perched in the Whitehall Zoo."
“Three fishermen went gaily out into the North.”
“ Three acres seemed pleasant to Countryman
Hodge.” Punch, 1885...

123
". Three Farmers went driving up into the town” 123
" Three Topers went strolling out into the East."
Hyde Parker. 1886

123
“ Three Poets went sailing down Boston streets.
Lilian Whiting

123
“ Three Filchers went cadging." The Free Lance 124
• Three Students were walking." The Lays of
the Mocking Sprite

I 24
"Three Melons went sailing out in the West”

124
Three Carpets hung waiving abroad in the
breeze"

124
“ Three worthless young fellows went out in the
night

124
“Three Sports got into a railroad car"

125
“Three husbands went reeling home out of the
West." Mrs. G. L. Banks

125
"Three young men who never went astray' 125
“Three Anglers went down to fish. Sunbury
Weir." The Angler s Journal, 1886

139
“ Three Freshers went sailing out into the street 139
An Umpire went sallying out into the East”

140
Three women went sailing out into the street 279
'Three little fishers trudged over the hill. F. H.
Stauffer

279
Three cows were seized for tithe rent in the West 280
Three fishers went fishing out into the sea. H. C.
Dodge

280
ODE TO THE NORTH-East Wind.
“Welcome, wild North-Easter!"

125
The Surgeon's Wind. Punch, 1857
Hang thee, vile North-Easter. Punch, 1858 126
“ Welcome, wild North-Easter,' as sung by a

Debutante at the last Drawing Room...
Welcome, English Easter. Fun, 1867

128
Kingsley, and the South-west Trains

128
" I once saw a sweet pretty face"

I 28
The Dirdum. A parody of C. Kingsley's Scotch
poem on an Oubit, 1862

129

...

a

...

126

127

Charles Kingsley.

:0:-

...

"THREE FISHERS WENT SAILING AWAY TO THE
WEST"...

117
". Three Merchants went riding." Punch, 1858 117
Four Merchants who thought themselve.;'

117
The Lasher at Illley. College Rhymes, 1861.
“Eight coveys went out in their college boat.” 117
“Three mothers sat talking." Punch, 1861

118
" Three freshmen went loafing." College Rhymes 118
Three fellahs went out to a house in the west.

118
“ Three husbands went forth.” Banter, 1867 118
"Three Children were playing.” The Mocking
Bird, F Field, 1868

119
“ Three Students sat writing.” The Cantab, 1873 119
“Three gourmands invited were into the West."

119
“ Three ladies went skating.” Idyls of the Rink 119
“Three regiments went sailing away to the East," 119
** Three practical men went strolling west."
“ Three profits had got to come out of the land."
“ Three lampkins went larking." Judy, 1879
“ Three rascals went ranting round in the West."

Gobo, The World, 1879
“ Three land agitators went down to the West.”
“Three Paddies went spouting away at Gurteen."

F, B. Doveton
“Three fishes were foating about in the Sea."

Thomas Moore.
TIS THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER

230
"Tis the first rose of Summer, R. Gilfillin...

230
Do.

do. Wiseheart's Songster 230
'Tis the last man in London. The National
Omnibus, 1831 ...

230
I'm the last Rose of Summer, 1832

231
'Tis the last summer bonnet. T. H. Bayly, 1833. . 231
'Tis the last bit of candle. Wiseheart's Songster 231
The last lamp of the alley. Dr. Maginn ...

232
'Tis the last choice Havana

232
"Tis the straw hat of summer

232
'Tis the last of the Fancy. Judy, 1867

232
'Tis the last weed of Hudson's. J. R.G.

233
'Tis the last little tizzy. The Snob, 1829

233
'Tis the last of the members. Figaro in London 233
'Tis the last fly of summer. Punch's Pocket
Book, 1848

233
He's the last .. Viva-Voce."

College Rhymes 234
'Tis the last belle of summer. Funny Folks

234
Tis the last pipe this winter. Funny Folks, 1879 234

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Thomas Moore-continued.

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To an Ancient Coquette

244
On College Dons

244
On Roast pork. F. B. Doveton, 1881

244
On Tory election promises, 1886 ...
Oh, blame not the Bard. Fun, 1883

245
Oh! the days are gone when beauty bright. 1869 245
LESBIA HATH A BEAMING EYE ...

245
Peggy hath a squinting eye...

245
Lesbia hath a fowl to cook ...

246
Lesbia's skirt doth streaming fly. Punch, 1856 ... 246
Lemon is a little hipped. Charles Dickens, 1855... 246
This suit is all chequer'd

246
OH! THE SHAMROCK

247
Oh! the Scarecrows. United Ireland, 1885 247

One more try at parting Punch's Almanac, 1883 247
THE YOUNG MAY MOON

248
The Irishman's serenade
The Bladder of whiskey

248
The Cat's serenade
The old March moon. Diogenes, 1854

248
Song of the Signalman, Punch, 1885

248
Defeated Manceuvres

249
THE MINstrel Boy

249
Mister Sheil into Kent has gone. W.M. Thackeray 249
The Sailor Boy on a tour is gone. 1832

249
The leary cove to the Mill is gone. 1832

249
The fiddler's boy to the fair is gone

249
The Koh-i-noor to the wall has gone. Punch, 1851 250
The Cordon Bleu (M. A. Soyer). Punch, 1855... 230
The Draper's man. Punch, 1857 ...

250
The Chinese Boy to the War is gone

250
The Errand Boy. Judy, 1869

250
The Beardless Boy. Punch, 1875...

250
The Minstrel Boy in the train. Funny Folks 250
Bradlaugh to protest is gone. 8. 7. Miott

251
The Warrior Duke (of Cambridge)

251
The Alderman from Guildhall has gone. Judy, 1880 251
The Girton Girl to Exam' has gone. Funny Folks 251
The Grand old Boy. Punch, 1882...

251
The Noble Lord to the stores is gone. Judy, 1882 251
Sir D. V. Gay to the poll is gone. United Ireland 252
Our Bradlaugh boy

252
The 'prentice boy to the street has gone

252
The Grand Young Man. F. B. Doveton...

252
The Grand old man to the North has gone. Life

253
The Grand old man. Songs for Liberal electors 253
The Shy Bo-Peep to the sea is gone. A.H.S. 276
The time I've lost in “screwing"

253
Come, rest on this gridiron. Punch, 1881

253
To the Finish I went. Dr. W. Maginn

253
I saw up the steps. Lays of the Mocking Sprite 253

I saw from my window. Girl of the Period, 1869 254
SAIL ON, SAIL ON, THOU FEARLESS BARK

254
Scale on, scale on, oh! tuneless strummer

254
THEE, THEE, ONLY THEE

254
Tea, Tea, only Tea. Punch, 1884

254
Oh ! CALL IT BY SOME BETTER NAME

254
Oh, try, good sirs, some better game. 1886. B.
Saunders

254
Oh ! try some worthier, better game.
Oh! call it by some better name. 7. Fitzpatrick 255
Oh! call it by some fitter name. Gossamer

255
Oh! call him by some stronger name.

Robert
Puttick

255
I KNEW BY THE SMOKE THAT SO GRACEFULLY
CURL'D

255
I knew by the wig that so gracefully curl'd

255

'Tis the last jar of pickles

234
He's the last of his party. R. H. Lawrence 234
'Tis the last baked potato. I. W. Dixon

235
'Tis a prime leg of mutton. Lizzie Griffin

235
'Tis the last rose of Windsor. F. Rawkins

235
'Tis the last blow of a drummer. Hugh Cayley... 235
'Tis the last ruse of someone. The Globe, 1886... 236
Let Erin remember. Punch. 1885

236
WHEN HE WHO ADORES THEE ...

236
To a Bottle of old Port. Dr. Maginn
When he who adjures thee
When he who now bores thee

264
THE HARP THAT ONCE THROUGH Tara's HALLS 236

The Puff that once thro' Colburn's halls. 1831 ... 237
The Belt which once. Egan's Book of Sports, 1832 237
The Harp that once in Warren's Mart. Punch

237
The Broom that once through Sarah's halls. Judy 237
The Girl that oft in lighted halls, 1869

237
The Voice that once thro' Senate halls. Funny
Folks, 1884

237
Luke Sharpe, who once. Detroit Free Press, 1885 238
The Plate that once through Fashion's halls 264
Fly not yet, 'tis just the hour. Figaro, 1833

260
Fly not to wine. The Blue Bag, 1832

238
Fly not yet. St. James's Gazette, 1881

238
RICH AND RARE WERE THE GEMS SHE WORE

Rich and surred was the robe he wore, 7. Hook 238
Ragged and rough were the clothes she wore

239
Rich and rare were the arms she bore

239'
Rough and red was the cloak she wore

239
Quaint and queer were the gems she wore

264
THERE IS NOT IN THE WIDE WORLD

239
There is not in this city an alley so sweet. National
Omnibus, 1831 ...

239
There is not in the palace. National Omnibus 239
There's not in Saint Stephen's. Figaro in London 239
There is not in all London. Punch, 1842

240
There's not in the wide world a country so sweet 240
There's not in the wide world an odour less sweet 240
O, There's not in the West-end, Punch. 1872 .. 240
There's not in all London a tavern So gay.
G. W. M. Reynolds

240
On Stephen Kemble

240
The Irish welcome

241
The Trifle. Punch, 1852

241
The Bitter cry of outcast London. Two parodies

from the Weekly Dispatch, by T. A. Wilson
and Aramis

241
The meteing of the waters. Punch, 1884...

241
The Thames. B. Saunders. 1884

242
The House of Lords. H. B., 1884

242
There is not to the poet. E. A. Horne, 1884 242
The Heiress. Aramis. 1884

242
The Club Smoking-room. 3. Pratt, 1884...

242
The Meeting of the Emperors. Moonshine, 1884 243
There's not in old Ireland. Walter Parke

270
Come, send round the wine. 1825

243
BELIEVE ME, IF ALL THOSE ENDEARING YOUNG
CHARMS

243
Mr. Colburn to Lady Morgan's Books, 1831 243
On the House of Lords and Reform. Figaro in
London, 1831

243
Believe me, dear Susan. Diogenes, 1854

243
To a lady in a crinoline. Punch, 1857

244
John Bull to Paddy, 1867

244
John Bright to his place, 1869

244

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Wus! ever wus ! H. Cholmondeley-Pennell

268
'Twas ever thus ! C. S. Calverley...

268
I never bought a young Gazelle

269
The young Gazelle, a Moore-ish tale. Walter Parke 269
Come hither, come hither, by night and by day 270
A Parody. On the House of Commons, 1832 270
Sweet Borough of Tamworth 1832...

270
The Sweet Briar. C. S. K.

271
Miscellaneous Parodies on Paradise and the
Peri'

271
Lalla Rookh Burlesque. Vincent Amcotts

272
One more Irish Melody, 1869

272
On Lord Brougham, 1833

272
Luves of the Mortals

272
Loves of the New Police

273
Jack Randall's Diary, 1820

273
Young Love once fell through a straw-thatched
shed

273
The Bencher, or whitewashing day

273
The Living Lustres. Rejected Addresses

273
A Fallen Angel over a Bowl of Rum-Punch.
Christopher N. rth, 1823

274
Love and the Flimsies. Thomas Love Peacock

275
The Bard of Erin's Lament

275
Old Sherry. (An Anacreontic, 1928)

275
ANACREON'S ODE XXI.
“Observe when mother earth is dry"

276
Earlier translations by Ronsard , Capilupus,

Shakespeare, Lord Rochester, and Abraham
Cowley

276
On Moore's Plagiarisms. An article in Fraser's
Magazine, June, 1841

276
Lays of the Saintly. Wulter Parke

270
“ The Duke is the lad to frighten a lass," by
Thomas Moore ...

260

...

...

258

...

Thomas Moore-continued.
I knew by the post that so gaily display'd. The
Mirror, 1823

255
We knew by the string that so gracefuily curld 256
I saw by the steam that so gracefully curl'dl.
I knew by the smuke that so heavily curl'd

256
To Dizzy, “When time hath bereft thee," 1867 256
By the Thames to the right, is the flat shore of Erith 256

Had I a shilling left to spare. Dertie lyse
A CANADIAN BOAT SONG.
“Faintly as tolls the evening chime"

257
The Cabinet's Boat Song, 1878

257
“Plainly as tolls disruption's chime," 1886

257
HITHER, FLORA, QUEEN OF FLOWERS!

257
“ Hither, Flora of the street. T. A. Wilson

257
Hither, Flora, Queen of Flowers." dramis

Thistle 258
When in gao”'I shall calm recline
When in death I shall quiet be found

258
When in death I shall calm recline. 1832

271
Farewell ! but whenever you welcome the hour 259
To Tory hearts a round, boys

259
A nice Devill'd Biscuit. Punch

259
Apple pie. All new dishes fade.'

259
THOSE EVENING BELLS

259
Those Christmas Bills. W. Hone, 1826

259
That Chapel Bell. The Gownsman, 1830

26
My white moustache. Figaro, 1832

260
Those London belles. Miss Bryant

260
Those Ball-room belles. Diogenes, 1853

261
Those Scotch hotels, Diogenes, 1853

261
Those Gresham chimes. Punch, 1853

261
Those Tramway bells. Funny Folks

261
Those Evening bells. Tom Hood ...

261
Those London Bells. Shirley Brooks, 1855

261
Those Pretty Girls. J. W. W.

261
Those Vatted Rums. Punch, 1855

262
Those evening belles. Pan the Pilgriin

262
That Muffin bell. Punch, 1880

262
The Parcel Post. Judy, 1883

262
Those Evening belles. Moonshine, 1886

262
OFT, IN THE STILLY NIGHT

262
Oft, o'er my tea and toast. Figaro in London 263
Oft, in his present plight. The Puppet Show, 1848 263
Oft, in the chilly night. Memoirs of a Stomach... 263
Oft. on a “silly :' night. Funny Folks, 1878 263
Oft, in election's fight. Truth, 1886

263
HERE'S THE BOWER SHE LOVED SO MUCH

264
Here's the box that held the snuff

264
Here's the bottle she loved so much. 7. Bruton 264
THERE'S A BOWER OF ROSES BY BENDEMEER'S STREAM 264
There's of benches a row in St. Stephen's extreme

264
There's a bower of bean-vines in Benjamin's yard.
Phæbe Curey, 1854

264
One morn a Tory at the gate. Figaro, 1832 265
A Peri at the “ Royal” gate. Truth. 1877 265
This week a Peeress at the gate. Truth, 1883 265
One morn Ben Dizzy at the gate

266
FAREWELL, FAREWELL TO THEE, ARABY'S DAUGHTER 266
Farewell, farewell to thee, desolate Erin !

266
Farewell, farewell to thee, Arabi darling!

266
Begone, begone with thee, son of Shere Ali!

267
Away, away, with the Ameer unlucky!

267
Farewell, farewell to thee, Ireland's protector !

270
Ou ! EVER THUS, FROM CHILDHOOD'S HOUR
I never wrote up
“ Skates to Sell'

267
I never loved a dear gazelle

268
I never reard a young gazelle. H. S. Leigh 268
I never had a piece of toast
A Parody by Tom Hood the younger

268

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Rebecca and Rowena. W. M. Thackeray

A Tale of Drury Lane. Rejected Addresses
BLUE BONNETS OVER THE BORDER

Blue Stockings over the Border. Mirror 1828
Write, write, tourist and traveller. Robert Gilfillan
Read, read, Woodstock and Waverley, Robert

Gilpllan, 1831
Tax, tax, Income and Property. Punch, 1851
March, march, pipe-clayed and belted in
Take, take, lobsters and lettuces. Punch
Take, take, blue pill and colocynth. Punch

Drill, drill, London and Manchester. Punch, 1859
MR. KEMBLE'S FAREWELL ADDRESS, 1817

As the worn war-horse at the trumpet's sound"
Mr. Patrick Robertson's farewell to the Bar
As the worn show horse whom Ducrow so long"
Lament for Tabby, or the Cat's Coronach. The

Satirist, 1814
THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL
Introduction-

The way was long, the wind was cold
“ The tide was low, the wind was cold." Funny

Folks, 1875
"The sun was hot, the day was bright.” Weekly

Echo, 1885
The Lay of the last Cab-Hack. Funny Folks
The Bray of the last Donkey
The Lay of the last Ministry. Fun, 1885...
Mr. Barnum's Experience of Travelling...

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Sir Walter Scott- Continued.

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ROKEBY, 1813
Jokeby, by an amateur of Fashion, 1813 (attri-

buted to John Roby, also to Thomas Tegg,

and to the Brothers Smith)
O, Brignall banks are wild and fair"
“Oh, Giles's lads are brave and gay
Smokeby, in Ephemerides, 1813
Rokeby the second, in the Satirist, 1813 ...
MacArthur, an Epic Poem, ascribed to Walter

Scott. The Satirist, 1808
Valentines. The Satirist, 1810
The Ovation of the Empty Chair. The Satirist,

1811
Walter Scott, Esq., to his Publishers. Accepted

Addresses, 1813
The Poetic Mirror, or the Living Bards of Britain,

by James Hogg, 1816
O, heard ye never of Wat o' the Cleuch
The Battle of Brentford Green. Warreniana, 1824
The Bridal of Caolchairn. John H1y Allan, 1822
Rejected Odes. Humphrey Hedgehog, 1813
A Border Ballad. Thomas Love Peacock, 1837
6. Carle, now the King's come
“Sawney, now the King's come
The Battle of Wimbledon. Punch, 1862...
Kenilworth Burlesque, by R. Reece and H. B.

Farnie
The Lay of the Lost Minstrel
CORONATION LAYS.

The New Monthly Magazine, July, 1831. Con-
taining parodies of Walter Scott, The Lay of the
Lost Minstrel. T. Campbell, The Show in
Londen. S. T. Coleridge, " The Sun it shone on
spire and wall." W. Wordsworth, Sonnets on the
Coronazion. L. E. Landon, The Little Absentee.
George Crabbe, A Reflection. Thomas Moore,
A Melody. Thomas Hood, A Glance from a
Hood. Robert Southey, P.L., The Laureate's
Lay

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CANTO III.-
". And said I that my limbs were old”

78
“And thought they I was growing old."* They
are Five. 1880...

79
CANTO VI.-
“ Breathes there the man with soul so dead”

79
A declamation, by Miss Mudge, the Blue Stocking 79
“ Breathes there a Scot with soul so dead.
0. P. Q. P. Smiff. The Figaro, 1874

79
Pilosagine. Advertisement parody

80
“ Lives there a man with soul so dead”

80
“ Breathes there a man with taste so dead." The
Figaro, 1876

80
“O Caledonia ! very stern and wild." Jon Duan 80
Don Salisbury's Midnight Vigil. Truth, 1885 ... 81

Parody from the Lays of the Mocking Sprite 82
ALBERT GRAEME.
“It was an English ladye bright

81
“ It was a toper one Saturday night

81
“It was an Oxford Scholar bright.” The Shot-
over Papers, 1874

82
The Lay of the Poor Fiddler, 1814

81
St. Fillan's Arm. From Lays of the Saintly, by

Walter Parke
The Blue Brother. Walter Parke
The Lay of the Scottish Fiddle, 1814. James

Kirke Paulding
A Lay to the Last Minstrel. Edward Churton
MARMION.

O Woman ! in our hours of ease
Oh! Scotsman! in thine hour of ease
A good Wife ...

85
A Dedication to Women.

Finis, 1877

85
The Mansion House Marmion (Lord Mayor
Fowler). Truth, 1883

85
LOCHINVAR

86
Lock-and-Bar. Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine 86
“ () young William Jones is come out of the West."

87
“ The big-booted Czar had his eye on the East.”

Shirley Brooks, 1854
“It was Albert of Wales and his troop of
Hussars. Judy, 1871 ...

88
“ Choice of Stoke-upun-Trent, lo, Kenealy con-
fest." Punch, 1875

88
O young Stephey Cave is come out of the East."

89
Young Lochinvar in Blank Verse. Free Press
Flashes. 1883

89
“Oh! A Bishop from Surrey is come here to
pray. From Marmion Travesty, by Peter Pry 90
Epigrams on the Duke of York

91
A l'arody concerning Mr. Digby Pigott.. 1877... 116
THE LADY OF THE LAKE, 1810

91
The Lady of the Wreck, or Castle Blarneygig.

George Colman
“ The stag at eve had drunk his fill"
“The pig at eve was lank and faint's

91
BOAT SONG-

“Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances " 91
“ Hail our Chief ! now he's wet through with
whiskey.'
" George Colman

92
"Hail to the Chief” (Gladstone). Punch. 1880 92
The Nile Song Punch, 1863

99
Mountain Dhu; or, the Knight, the Lady, and the

Lake. Burlesque. Andrew Halliday, 1866 92
The Lady of the Lake, plaid in a new tartan. Bur-
lesque. by R. Reece

92
Raising the
Fiery Cross.

Punch, 1884 93

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The London University
March, march, dustnien and coal-heavers." The

Spirit of the Age, 1829
“Smöke, smoke ! Arcade and College Green”
OH WHERE, AND OH WHERE

“Oh where, and oh where, is my Harry
Brougham gone?" Punch, 1846 ...
Oh, where, and oh where, has my learned counsel

gone ?” Punch, 1848
The great kilt Reform. Diogenes, 1854...
“Oh where, and oh where, has our Wand'ring
Willie gone."

Judy, 1879
BONNIE DUNDEE
“To the gents of the pantry 'twas Yellow-plush

spoke,” 1872
The Maidens of Bonnie Dundee
“ And did they its meeting turn into a joke"
Tis a jolly conception " !-'twas Truscott who
spoke."

(The Temple Bar Obstruction)
“In the House of St. Stephen's Britannia thus

spoke
“To the lords of Creation 'twas Chamberlain

spoke"

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