Universal History: From the Creation of the World to the Beginning of the Eighteenth Century, Zväzok 2

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Strana 169 - Tutor of Athens ! he, in every street, Dealt priceless treasure : goodness his delight, Wisdom his wealth, and glory his reward. Deep through the human heart, with playful art, His simple question stole ; as into truth, And serious deeds, he smiled the laughing race ; Taught moral happy life, whate'er can bless Or grace mankind ; and what he taught he was.
Strana 92 - First unadorned, And nobly plain, the manly Doric rose ; The Ionic then, with decent matron grace, Her airy pillar heaved ; luxuriant last, The rich Corinthian spread her wanton wreath.
Strana 42 - Septuairint translation was in use in the time of our Saviour, and is that out of which most of the citations in the New Testament from the Old are taken. It was likewise the canonical translation used by all the Christian churches from the...
Strana 217 - to thy lover, and carry with thee that degenerate passion which makes thee prefer a dead enemy to the glory of thy country." The offender was brought before the duumviri, two criminal judges appointed by Tullus, and was by them condemned to death. By the advice of Tullus, he appealed to the assembly of the people, who, in compassion to the deliverer of his country, commuted his punishment to passing under the yoke, and at the same time decreed him a trophy. This incident shows one fact of importance,...
Strana 94 - ... not possible to frame a fourth, but by combining the former. 5. The Gothic architecture offers no contradiction to these observations. The effect which it produces cannot be altogether accounted for from the rules of symmetry or harmony in the proportions between the several parts; but depends on a certain idea of vastness, gloominess, and solemnity, which are powerful ingredients in the sublime.
Strana 77 - The ingenious author of an Essay on the History of Civil Society * thus enlarges on the idea of M. Montesquieu : — " In democracy," says he, " men must love equality ; they must respect the rights of their fellow-citizens ; they must unite by the common ties of affection to the state. In forming personal pretensions, they must be satisfied with that degree of consideration which they can procure by their abilities fairly measured with those of an opponent. They must labour for the public without...
Strana 245 - Rome, particularly among the young patricians, who preferred the luxuries and splendor of a royal court to the simplicity and austerity of a republic. A plot was formed to open the gates to receive him, and, upon its being discovered, Brutus had the mortification to...
Strana 90 - ... all these have a propriety in this order of architecture, which is quite agreeable to its character. Of this order were constructed some of the noblest of the Greek temples ; particularly the temple of Apollo at Miletus, that of the Delphic oracle, and the superb temple of Diana at Ephesus, classed among the wonders of the world. The last of the Grecian orders of architecture is the Corinthian. It marks a period of luxury and magnificence, when pomp and splendor had become the predominant passion,...
Strana 89 - ... even when time had brought the arts to the highest perfection they ever attained among the Romans, this people never ceased to acknowledge the high superiority of the Greeks, of which we have this convincing proof, that when the Roman authors celebrate any exquisite production of art, it is ever the work of a Phidias, Praxiteles, Lysippus, Glycon, Zeuxis, Apelles, Parrhasius, or, in fine, of some artist who adorned that splendid period, and not of those who had worked at Rome, or who had lived...
Strana 259 - Roman constitution might long have remained, what we have seen it was at first, aristocratical. But a torrent imprudently resisted will in time acquire that impetuous force which carries every thing before it. The patricians, sensible that they had pushed matters to a most alarming extreme, and now thoroughly intimidated, were obliged to grant the demand of creating popular magistrates. The tribunate being once established, we shall see it become the main object with these magistrates to increase...

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