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Q. Horatii Flacci

SATIR Æ.

THE

SATIRES

O F

HORA C E.

VOL. III.

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Q. HORATII FLACCI

SATIRAR UM

LIBER PRIMUS.

SAT. I. Ad MECENATEM.

UI fit, Mæcenas, ut nemo, quam fibi fortem,

Q Seu Ratio dederit, feu Fors objecerit, illâ

Contentus vivat; laudet diverfa fequentes ?

O

1

Horace addreffes this firft Satire to Mæcenas, as he hath inscribed to him the first of his Odes, Epodes and Epiftles: at least they have been handed down to us in this Form, and may be confidered as Dedications of the different Parts of our Poet's Works. Inconftancy and Avarice are here treated of with fo much Art and Addrefs (as indeed are all the Subjects of his Satires) that if his Odes have given our Author the Character of the firft and greatest Lyric Poet, we may be bold to fay, that his Epiftles and Satires fhall make him ever esteemed as a Philofopher inferior only to Socrates. It has been long acknowledged, that Philosophy is the Daughter of Poetry; but he was carried off, when very young, and concealed under various Difguifes. At laft fhe hath found her real Parents, the Poets, and Horace hath been the firft to raife her from Obfcurity. DACIER.

Verf. 1. Qui fit] The Conduct of Mankind is a perfect Riddle. Always difcontented with their present Situation, and fond of changing it for any other; yet put it into their Power to change, and they certainly refufe, what they fo ardently defired. What Words can define an Animal of this Character! SANADON.

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THE FIRST

воок

OF THE

SATIRES of HORACE.

SAT. I. To MECENA S.

W

HENCE is it, Sir, that none contented lives
With the fair Lot, which prudent Reason gives,
Or Chance prefents, yet all with Envy view
The Schemes, that others variously pursue ?

Broken

2. Seu ratio dederit.] The Choice of Words in this Expreffion is worth observing. The Gifts of Reason are always valuable, because they are beftowed with Judgment and Discernment. Ratio dat. But Fortune, incapable of distinguishing, blindly throws her Favours round her. Fors objicit.

Perhaps the Poet intended to balance between the Principles of the Stoics, who believed, that all Events of Life were directed by the Reafon and Order of Providence; and the Opinion of the Epicureans, who imagined that the World was wholly governed by Fortune. VETUS INTERPRES.

3. Laudet diverfa fequentes.] Horace hath been reproached for contradicting, in this Satire, what he said in the first Ode. But he there fpeaks of the Paffions, which direct Mankind in their Purfuits of Happinefs; here he treats of the different Profeffions in which they are engaged.

DAC.

4. Gravis

B 2

O fortunati mercatores! gravis armis
Miles ait, multo jam fractus membra labore.
Contra mercator, navim jactantibus Auftris,
Militia eft potior. Quid enim? concurritur: horæ
Momento cita mors venit, aut victoria læta.
Agricolam laudat juris legumque peritus,
Sub galli cantum confultor ubi oftia pulfat.
Ille, datis vadibus qui rure extractus in urbem eft,
Solos felices viventes clamat in urbe.

Cætera de genere hoc (adeò funt multa) loquacem
Delaffare valent Fabium. Ne te morer, audi
Quò rem deducam. Si quis Deus, en ego, dicat.
Jam faciam quod vultis ; eris tu, qui modò miles,
Mercator: tu confultus modò, rufticus: hinc vos,
Vos hinc, mutatis difcedite partibus; Eia,
Quid! ftatis? Nolint. Atqui licet effe beatis.
Quid caufæ eft, meritò quin illis Jupiter ambas
Iratus buccas inflet, neque fe fore pofthac
Tam facilem dicat, votis ut præbeat aurem ?

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Præ

4. Gravis armis.] We fhall acknowledge the Neceffity of this Correction (propofed by a Perfon, who has concealed his Name) if we confider, that Soldiers, beyond fix or feven and forty Years of Age, were discharged from the Service in the Time of Augustus. Indeed it would be difficult to find an older Man, capable of carrying that almost incredible Weight of Arms and Baggage, which a Roman Soldier was obliged to bear. Befides, if thefe Complaints were caused by the Soldier's Age, they must probably continue for his Life; but in the other Examples, cited by the Poet, they arise only from fome light occafional Difguft. The Merchant envies the Soldier, only while the Tempeft continues; as the Lawyer, when his Clients difturb his Reft, would exchange his Condition for that of the Ruftic, who envies not the Citizen, but when he is fummoned to Town. What, beyond all Doubt, confirms the Neceflity of this Correction, is, that when the Poet afks, why they do not accept this Offer of Jupiter, they answer, they were determined to bear the Dangers and Fatigues of their Profeffions, that they might gain an eafy Competence for their old Age. Senes ut in otia tuta recedant.

7. Hora

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