The history of England, by D. Hume, continued by T. Smollett, and to the 23rd year of the reign of queen Victoria by E. Farr and E.H. Nolan. 3 vols. [in 12 pt.].

Predný obal
 

Čo hovoria ostatní - Napísať recenziu

Na obvyklých miestach sme nenašli žiadne recenzie.

Obsah

Iné vydania - Zobraziť všetky

Časté výrazy a frázy

Populárne pasáže

Strana 369 - To this circumstance it is owing, that they have continued to correspond and converse only with one another; so that very few of them, even of those who have been born there, have yet learned to speak or understand the English tongue. However, as they were all zealous protestants, and in general strong hardy men...
Strana 320 - Latton refusing to comply with this arbitrary demand, his house was surrounded by a detachment of soldiers, who violently dragged his secretary from his presence, and threw him into a dismal subterranean dungeon, where he continued twenty days. The English slaves, to the number of twenty-seven, were condemned to the same fate : the ambassador himself was degraded from his character, deprived of his allowance, and sequestered from all communication. All the letters directed to him were intercepted,...
Strana 443 - ... proofs which must convince mankind that the ancient spirit of the British nation still subsisted in its full force. They were given to understand, that the king had taken all such measures as appeared the most conducive to the accomplishment of their...
Strana 400 - An Act for amending, explaining and reducing into one Act of Parliament the Laws relating to the Government of His Majesty's Ships, vessels and forces by Sea...
Strana 397 - American bar-iron, duty free, would be attended with numberless ill consequences both of a public and private nature ; specifying certain hardships to which they in particular would be exposed ; and praying, that, if the bill should pass, they might be relieved from the pressure of an act passed in the reign of Henry VIII. obliging the owners of coppice-^ woods to...
Strana 392 - ... and to take all such measures as may be necessary to disappoint or defeat any enterprises or designs of his enemies, and as the exigencies of affairs may require.
Strana 360 - This accident was foreseen by almost every person who knew any thing of our plantations upon the continent of America; for the people of Virginia, who think of no produce but their tobacco, and do not raise corn enough even for their own subsistence, being, by the nature of their country, well provided with the conveniency of water conveyance, have but few...
Strana 320 - ... merchandise. This employment naturally devolves to those nations whose vessels are in no danger from the depredations of the barbarians; namely, the subjects of the maritime powers, who, for this puny advantage, not only tolerate the piratical states of Barbary, but even supply them with arms and ammunition, solicit their passes, and purchase their forbearance with annual presents, which are in effect equivalent to a tribute : Whereas, by one vigorous exertion of their power, they might destroy...
Strana 392 - ... hospital for the maintenance and education of exposed and deserted young children...
Strana 358 - ... and possessions of his crown, had afforded him the greatest satisfaction : that his desire to preserve the public tranquillity had been sincere and uniform : that he had religiously adhered to the stipulations of the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, and made it his care not to injure or offend any power whatsoever ; but...

Bibliografické informácie