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Which to reduce into our former favour,
you are assembled: and my speech entreats
that I may know the let, why gentle Peace
should not expel these inconveniencies,
and bless us with her former qualities.

W. SHAKESPEARE

1078 HONOUR MUST BE ACTIVE TO PRESERVE ITS

LUSTRE.

ULYSSES TO ACHILLES

TIM

'IME hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,

wherein he puts alms for oblivion, a great-sized monster of ingratitudes: those scraps are good deeds past; which are devour'd as fast as they are made, forgot as soon as done: perséverance, dear my lord, keeps honour bright: to have done, is to hang quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail in monumental mockery. Take the instant way; for honour travels in a strait so narrow, where one but goes abreast: keep, then, the path ; for emulation hath a thousand sons, that one by one pursue: if you give way, or hedge aside from the direct forthright, like to an enter'd tide, they all rush by, and leave you hindmost; or, like a gallant horse fallen in first rank, lie there for pavement to the abject rear, o'er-run and trampled on: then what they do in pre

sent, though less than yours in past, must o’ertop yours. The present eye praises the present object: then marvel not, thou great and complete man, that all the Greeks begin to worship Ajax ; since things in motion sooner catch the eye, than what not stirs. The cry went once on thee, and still it might; and yet it may again, if thou wouldst not entomb thyself alive, and case thy reputation in thy tent; whose glorious deeds, but in these fields of late, made emulous missions 'mongst the gods themselves, and drave great Mars to faction.

W. SHAKESPEARE

1079

THE MASTER SPIRIT
G
IVE me a spirit that on life's rough sea

loves to have his sails filled with a lusty wind,
even till his sail-yards tremble, his masts crack,
and his rapt ship run on her side so low,
that she drinks water, and her keel ploughs air.
There is no danger to a man that knows
what life and death is : there's not any law
exceeds his knowledge; neither is it lawful
that he should stoop to any other law;
he goes before them and commands them all,
that to himself is a law rational.

G. CHAPMAN

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H
ER father lov'd me; oft invited me;

still question'd me the story of my life,
from year to year,—the battles, sieges, fortunes,
that I have pass’d.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days,
to the very moment that he bade me tell it:
wherein I spoke of most disastrous chances,
of moving accidents by flood and field;
of hair-breadth scapes i' the imminent deadly breach ;
of being taken by the insolent foe,
and sold to slavery; of my redemption thence,
and portance in my travel's history;
wherein of antres vast and deserts idle,
rough quarries, rocks and hills whose heads touch

heaven, it was my hint to speak,—such was the process; and of the Cannibals that each other eat, the Anthropophagi, and men whose heads do grow beneath their shoulders. This to hear, would Desdemona seriously incline: but still the house-affairs would draw her thence; which ever as she could with haste despatch, she'd come again, and with a greedy ear devour up my discourse :—which I observing took once a pliant hour; and found good means

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to draw from her a prayer of earnest heart
that I would all my pilgrimage dilate,
whereof by parcels she had something heard,
but not intentively: I did consent;
and often did beguile her of her tears,
when I did speak of some distressful stroke
that my youth suffer'd. My story being done,
she gave me for my pains a world of sighs;
she swore,-in faith,'twas strange, 'twas passing strange:
'twas pitiful, 'twas wond'rous pitiful:
she wish'd she had not heard it; yet she wish'd
that heaven had made her such a man: she thank'd

me;
and bade me, if I had a friend that lov'd her,
I should but teach him how to tell my story,
and that would woo her. Upon this hint I spake:
she lov'd me for the dangers I had pass'd;
and I lov'd her that she did pity them.
This only is the witchcraft I have us'd.

W. SHAKESPEARE

1081

JOHANNA MAID OF ORLEANS

S
HE shuns her sisters' gay companionship;

seeks out the desert mountains, leaves her couch
before the crowing of the morning cock,
and in the dreaded hour, when men are wont
confidingly to seek their fellow-men,
she, like the solitary bird, creeps forth,
and in the fearful spirit-realm of night,
to yon crossway repairs, and there alone
holds secret commune with the mountain wind.
Wherefore this place precisely doth she choose?
Why hither always does she drive her flock?
For hours together I have seen her sit
in dreaming musing 'neath the Druid tree,
which every happy creature shuns with awe :
for 'tis not holy there; an evil spirit
hath since the fearful pagan days of old
beneath its branches fixed his dread abode.

A. SWANWICK from Schiller

1082

THE WORLD A DEN OF MERE DESPIGHT

WHO

HO looks upon this world and not beyond

on the abodes it leads to, must believe it the bloody slaughter-house of some ill power, rather than the contrivance of a good one. Everything here breeds misery to man; the sea breeds storms to sink him: if he flees to shore for aid, the shore breeds rocks to tear him: the earth breeds briars to rend him, trees to hang him. Those things that seem his friends are false to him: the air that gives him breath gives him infection : meat takes his health away, and drink his reason: his reason is so great a plague to him, he never is so pleased as when he's robbed on't by drink or madness.

J. CROWNE

1083

THIS
"HIS lamp must be replenished; but even then

it will not burn so long as I must watch:
my slumbers—if I slumber—are not sleep,
but a continuance of enduring thought,
which then I can resist not : in my heart
there is a vigil, and these eyes but close
to look within ; and yet I live, and bear
the aspect and the form of breathing men ;
but grief should be the instructor of the wise.
Sorrow is knowledge. They who know the most
must mourn the deepest o’er the fatal truth.

O

1084

CYRIL TO IDA
FAIR and strong and terrible! Lioness

that with your long locks play the Lion's mane!
but Love and Nature, these are two more terrible
and stronger. See, your foot is on our necks,
we vanquish’d, you the Victor of your will.
What would you more? give her the child ! remain
orb’d in your isolation : he is dead,
or all as dead: henceforth we let you be:

win you the hearts of women ; and beware
lest, when you seek the common love of these,
the common hate with the revolving wheel
should drag you down, and some great Nemesis
break from a darken'd future, crown'd with fire,
and tread you out for ever,

A. TENNYSON

1085

COMMUNION WITH OUR FELLOW-MEN

'TIS

"IS nature's law,

that none, the meanest of created things, of forms created the most vile and brute, the dullest or most noxious, should exist divorced from good,-a spirit and pulse of good, a life and soul, to every mode of being inseparably linked. Then be assured that least of all can aught that ever own'd the heaven-regarding eye and front sublime which man is born to, sink, howe'er depressed, so low as to be scorned without a sin, without offence to God, cast out of view, like the dry remnant of a garden-flower whose seeds are shed, or as an implement worn out and useless.

W. WORDSWORTH

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