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1141

CONAN
С.
C
ONAN’S name, my lay, rehearse,
build to him the

lofty verse,
sacred tribute of the bard,
verse, the hero's sole reward.
As the flame's devouring force,
as the whirlwind in its course,
as the thunder's fiery stroke
glancing on the shivered oak;
did the sword of Conan mow
the crimson harvest of the foe.

T. GRAY

HERCULES

ALCIDES thus his

1142

race began, o'er infancy he swiftly ran ; the future god at first was more than man: dangers and toils, and Juno's hate, even o'er his cradle lay in wait, and there he grappled first with fate : in his young hands the hissing snakes he press’d; so early was the deity confessed : thus by degrees he rose to Jove's imperial seat ; thus difficulties prove a soul legitimately great.

J. DRYDEN

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1143

CONSCIENCE
To meanes at all to hide
man

from himself can find ;
no way to start aside
out of the hell of mind;
but in himself confinde
he still sees sin before ;
and winged-footed paine
that swiftly comes behind ;
the which is evermore
the sure and certain gaine
impietie doth get,
and wanton boast respect,
that doth himself forget.

S. DANIEL

1144 REFLECTIONS OF THE CHORUS ON THE QUARREL

BETWEEN FERREX AND PORREX

WHE

THEN youth not bridled with a guiding stay

is left to randon of their own delight, and weldes whole realmes by force of sovereign sway,

great is the daunger of unmaistred might, lest skillesse rage throwe downe with headlong fall their lands, their states, their lives, themselves and all. When growing pride doth fill the swelling brest,

and greedy lust doth rayse the climbing minde, Oh hardlie maye the perill be represt.

Ne feare of angrie goddes, ne lawes kinde, ne countries care can fired hartes restrayne

whan force hath armed envie and disdaine. 1 145 When kings of foresette will neglect the rede

of best advise, and yelde to pleasing tales that do their fansies noysome humour feede,

ne reason, nor regarde of right availes ; succeding heapes of plagues shall teach too late to learne the mischiefes of misguided state. Foule fall the traitour false that undermines

the love of brethren, to destroye them both. Wo to the prince, that pliant eare enclynes

and yeldes his minde to poysonous tale that floweth from flattering mouth; and woe to wretched land that wastes itselfe with civill sworde in hande!

SACKVILLE AND NORTON

1146 REFLECTIONS ON GORBODUC'S DIVISION OF HIS

KINGDOM BETWEEN HIS TWO SONS
WH
THEN settled stay doth hold the royall throne
in stedfast place by knowen and doubtles

right:
and chiefly when descent on one alone

makes single and unparted reigne to light ;
ech chaunge of course unjoints the whole estate
and yeldes it thrall to ruine by debate.
The strength, that knit by faste accorde in one

against all forrein power of mightie foes
could of itselfe defend itselfe alone,

disjoyned once, tho former force doth lose.

The stickes, that sondred brake so soone in twaine, in faggot bounde attempted were in vaine.

SACKVILLE AND NORTON

1147

SONG IN ARCADES
'ER the smooth enamelled green,

,

follow me, as I sing

and touch the warbled string ;
under the shady roof
of branching elm star-proof

follow me.
I will bring you where she sits,
clad in splendour as befits

her deity.
Such a rural queen

all Arcadia hath not seen. 1148 Nymphs and shepherds, dance no more

by sandy Ladon's lilied banks : on old Lycæus or Cyllene hoar

trip no more in twilight ranks ;
though Erymanth your loss deplore,

a better soil shall give ye thanks.
From the stony Mænalus
bring your flocks, and live with us;
there ye shall have greater grace,
to serve the lady of this place.
Though Syrinx your Pan's mistress were,
yet Syrinx well might wait on her.

Such a rural queen
ali Arcadia hath not seen.

J. MILTON

ASIA

My ,

1149

Y soul is an enchanted boat,

which, like a sleeping swan, doth float upon the silver waves of thy sweet singing ;

and thine doth like an angel sit

beside the helm conducting it,
whilst all the winds with melody are ringing.

Meanwhile thy spirit lifts its pinions
in music's most serene dominions ;

catching the winds that fan that happy heaven.

And we sail on, away, afar,

without a course, without a star,
but by the instinct of sweet music driven.

P. B. SHELLEY 1150

SOLITUDE
H

OW blest are they that waste their weary hours

in solemn groves and solitary bowers,
where neither eye nor ear
can see or hear
the frantic mirth
and false delights of frolic earth;
where they may sit and pant,
and breathe their pursy souls;
where neither grief consumes, nor griping want
afflicts, nor sullen care controuls.
Away false joys; ye murther where ye kiss :
there is no heaven to that, no life to this.

F. QUARLES

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NOW

N

OW is done thy long day's work ;

fold thy palms across thy breast,
fold thine arms, turn to thy rest.

Let them rave.
Shadows of the silver birk
sweep the green that folds thy grave.

Let them rave.
Thee nor carketh care nor slander;
nothing but the small cold worm
fretteth thine enshrouded form.

Let them rave.
Light and shadow ever wander
o'er the green that folds thy grave.
Let them rave.

A. TENNYSON

DIRGE

1152 Chor.

GLORIES, pleasures, pomps, delights and ease

,

can but please
the outward senses, when the mind
is, or untroubled, or by peace refined.

ist Voice Crowns may flourish and decay,

beauties shine, but fade away. 2nd Voice Youth may revel, yet it must

lie down in a bed of dust. 3rd Voice Earthly honours flow and waste,

time alone doth change and last.
Chor. Sorrows mingled with content, prepare

rest for care;
love only reigns in death: though art
can find no comfort for a broken heart.

J. FORD

1153

DIRGE IN A FUNERAL PAGEANT

ALL

LL the flowers of the spring

meet to perfume our burying ;
these have but their growing prime,
and man does flourish but his time:
survey our progress from our birth;
we are set, we grow, we turn to earth.
Courts adieu, and all delights,
all bewitching appetites!
Sweetest breath and clearest eye
(like perfumes) go out and die;
and consequently this is done
as shadows wait upon the sun.
Vain the ambition of kings,
who seek by trophies and dead things
to leave a living name behind,
and weave but nets to catch the wind.

J. WEBSTER

1154 REFLECTIONS ON THE DEATH OF SAMSON

LL is best, though we oft doubt,

of Highest Wisdom brings about,
and ever best found in the close.
Oft He seems to hide his face,
but unexpectedly returns;
and to his faithful champion hath in place
bore witness gloriously: whence Gaza mourns,

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