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Passages for Translation into Greek Comic Verse 575

to tug you to his wherry, and dislodge you
from your rich tables, when your hour is come:
I muse the gods send not a plague amongst you,
a good, brisk, sweeping, epidemic plague:
there's nothing else can make you all immortal.

R. CUMBERLAND

1431

I'M peppered:

I was in the midst of all, and banged of all hands:
they made an anvil of my head; it rings yet;
never so threshed. Do you call this fame? I have

famed it ;
I have got immortal fame; but I'll no more on't:
I'll no such scratching saint to serve hereafter.
O’ my conscience, I was killed above twenty times;
and yet, I know not what a devil's in it,
I crawled away, and lived again still. I am hurt

plaguily. 1432

BAPTISTA-HORTENSIO
Bap. How now, my friend! why dost thou look so

pale
Hor. For fear, I promise you, if I look pale.
Bap. What, will my daughter prove a good musician?
Hor. I think, she'll sooner prove a soldier:

iron may hold with her, but never lutes.
Bap. Why, then thou canst not break her to the lute?
Hor. Why, no, for she hath broke the lute to me.

I did but tell her she mistook her frets,
and bowed her hand to teach her fingering,
when with a most impatient, devilish spirit,
'frets, call you these?' quoth she, “I'll fume with

them:
and with that word she struck me on the head,
and through the instrument my pate made way.

W. SHAKESPEARE

1433 K.

KATHARINE-GRUMIO
PRYTHEE go, and get me some repast;

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I .

G.

K.

What say you to a neat's foot?
'Tis passing good: I prythee let me have it.

G. I fear, 'tis too choleric a meat.

How say you to a fat tripe, finely broiled ?
K. I like it well: good Grumio, fetch it me.
G. I cannot tell; I fear 'tis choleric.

What say you to a piece of beef, and mustard ?
K. A dish that I do love to feed upon.
G. Ay, but the mustard is too hot a little.
K. Why, then the beef, and let the mustard rest.

W. SHAKESPEARE

1434

praeter spem,

atque incredibile hoc mi obtigit: ita sum irritatus, animum ut nequeam ad cogitan

dum instituere. Quamobrem omnes, cum secundae res sunt maxume,

tum maxume meditari secum oportet, quo pacto advorsam aerum

nam ferant: pericla, damna, exilia peregre rediens semper cogitet, aut fili peccatum, aut uxoris mortem, aut morbum

filiae: communia esse haec; ne quid horum unquam accidat

animo novum, quicquid praeter spem eveniat, omne id deputare esse in lucro.

T. M. PLAVTVS. 1435 FATHERS INCONSIDERATE TO THEIR SONS

UAM iniqui sunt patres in omnis adolescentes

iudices! qui aequom esse censent, nos iam a pueris illico

nasci senes: neque illarum affines esse rerum, quas fert adoles

centia: ex sua libidine moderantur, nunc quae est, non quae

olim fuit. Mihi si unquam filius erit, nae ille facili me utetur

patre : nam et cognoscendi et ignoscendi dabitur peccatis

locus; non ut meus, qui mihi per alium ostendit suam

sententiam.

Q

Perii! is mihi, ubi adbibit plus paulo, sua quae

narrat facinora ? Nunc ait, periculum ex aliis facito, tibi quod ex

usu siet: astutus: nae ille haud scit, quam mihi nunc surdo

narret fabulam.

P. TERENTIVS AFER

WHAT

1436

PAULO-SLAVE-MERCHANT P.

HAT can he do?

S. Why anything that's ill, and never blush at it: he's so true a thief, that he'll steal from himself, and think he has got

by it. He stole out of his mother's belly, being an infant; and from a lousy nurse he stole his nature, from a dog his look, and from an ape his nimbleness; he will look in your face and pick your pockets, rob ye the most wise rat of a cheese-paring; there, where a cat will go in, he will follow, his body has no back-bone. Now if any of you be given to the excellent art of lying, behold, before you here, the master-piece!

P. MASSINGER

1437

THE SOLDIER'S LIFE

WHA

HAT slave would be a soldier, to be censured

by such as ne'er saw danger? to have our pay, our worths and merits, balanced in the scale of base moth-eaten peace? I have had wounds would have made all this bench faint and look pale, but to behold them searched. They lay their heads on their soft pillows, pore upon their bags, grow fat with laziness and resty ease; and us, that stand betwixt them and disaster, they will not spare a drachma. O! my soldiers, before you want, I'll sell my small possessions, even to my skin, to help you; plate and jewels, all shall be yours. Men that are men indeed, the earth shall find, the sun and air must feed.

J. WEBSTER F. S.

III

37

1438

S.

H.
S.

H.

SPUNGIUS-HIRCIUS
I

SEE the beginning of my end, for I am almost

starved. So am not I; but I am more than famished. All the members in my body are in a rebellion one against another. So are mine; and nothing but a cook, being a constable, can appease them, presenting to my nose, instead of his painted staff, a spit full of roast meat. But in this rebellion, what uproars do they make! my belly cries to my mouth, Why dost not gape and feed me? And my mouth sets out a throat to my hand, Why dost thou not lift up meat and cram my chops with it ? Then my hand hath a Aing at mine eyes, because they look not out, and shark for victuals.

S.

H.

S.

P. MASSINGER

1439

PENURIO METHINKS, I am batten'd well of late, grown fat, high and kicking, - thanks to the bounteous Rugio; and now, methinks, I scorn these poor repasts, cheese-parings and the stinking tongues of pilchers: but why should I remember these? they are odious, they are odious in my eyes: the full fat dish now, the bearing dish is that I reverence, the dish an able serving-man sweats under, and bends i’ th' hams, as if the house hung on him, the state of a fat turkey, the decorum he marches in with, all the train and circumstance,'tis such a matter, such a glorious matter! and then his sauce with oranges and onions, and he display'd in all parts ! for such a dish now, and at my need, I would betray my father, and for a roasted conger all my country.

J. FLETCHER

1440

LOVE MISREPRESENTED BY PAINTERS

ONE thousands cares conflicting in my breast,

, slowly

thus I began to commune with myself-
Methinks these painters misapply their art,

and never knew the being which they draw;
for mark! their many false conceits of Love.
Love is nor male nor female, man nor god,
nor with intelligence nor yet without it,
but a strange compound of all these, uniting
in one mixt essence many opposites;
a manly courage with a woman's fear,
the madman's phrenzy in a reasoning mind,
the strength of steel, the fury of a beast,
the ambition of a hero—something 'tis,
but by Minerva and the gods I swear!
I know not what this nameless something is.

R. CUMBERLAND

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Don. !

proved themselves either knaves or madmen, and so were let go: there's none left now in our ship but a few citizens that let their wives keep their shop-books,

some philosophers and a few critics. Her. But what philosophers ha' ye? Don. Oh, very strange fellows; one knows nothing, dares not

aver he lives, goes, sees, feels. Nym. A most unenviable philosopher. Don. Another, that there is no present time; and that one

man to-day and to-morrow, is not the same man: so that he that yesterday owed money, to-day owes none;

because he is not the same man. Her. But why has the Duke thus laboured to have all the

fools shipped out of his dominions ? Don. Marry, because he would play the fool alone without

any rival.

J. MARSTON

FOOLS

1442

Fool
TOOLS, they are the only nation

worth men's envy or admiration;
free from care or sorrow-taking,
selves and others merry-making:
all they speak or do is sterling.
Your fool he is your great man's darling,

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