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259 from The Sea-voyage, Act iv. sc. 2.
262 from Richard III. Act i. sc. 1: 1. 2, barbed, caparisoned,

clothed in the trappings of war: barbe (a corrupt form of barde)
being the general name for the defensive armour with which

the horses of knights were covered in war. Nares' Glossary, s.v.
267 from The Night-Walker, Act iv. sc. 6.
269 quoted by CICERO, Tusc. Disp. I. c. 48.
287 1. I, thilke, this same : l. 4, ywexith, grows : sote, sweet.
288 1. 2, spreint, sprinkled: l. 5, sikernesse, security : 1. 7, unware,

unforeseen. 312 mell, meddle. 316 from The Dance of Death by Rabbi don Santoh. 324 from The Maid of Honour, Act iii. sc. 1. 325 from The Picture, Act iv. sc. 2. 331 from Bonduca, Act v. sc. 5. 344 from The Virgin Martyr, Act ii. sc. 1. 346 1. 8, quillets, slight tricks or turns in argument; probably for

quibblets, dim. of quibbles.
353 from Valentinian, Act v. sc. 2.
356 1. 5, spets, i. q. spits.
359 from i Henry IV. Act i. sc. 3 : 1. 3, confound, spend, lose :

1. 9, crisp, curled by the breeze: Shakespeare uses the same
word to express the twisted form of the clouds, crisp heaven,

Tim. Act iv. sc. 3.
361 from Rollo, Act ii. sc. 1.
366 from The Mourning Bride, Act ii. sc. 7.
385 from The Arraignment of Paris : 1. 7, raught, reached.
388 from The Two Noble Kinsmen, Act ii. sc. 1.
390 from Philip Van Artevelde, PART II. Act ii. sc. 7.
392 l. 4, fair vestal, a compliment to Queen Elizabeth : 1. 10, fancy-

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free, exempt from the power of love.

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395 1. 10, 1, i. q. aye. 396 from Agrippina, an unfinisht tragedy. 401 from 2 Henry IV. Act v. sc. 2: 1. 1, the meaning is, My wild

dispositions having ceased on my father's death, and being now, as it were, buried in his tomb, sin and wildness are interred in

the same grave : 1. 3, sadly, seriously. 402 translated from a fragment of the Thyestes of Sophocles. 405 from The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act v. sc. 4: 1. 6, record,

sing: so J. Fletcher, Valentinian, II. I, 'as birds record their lessons. According to Douce, the term was formed from the

recorder or fiageolet, by which birds were taught. 430 from The Arraignment of Paris, Act iii. sc. 3: 1. 8, wrape, i.e.

ravish, delight; 1.9, amiss, i. e. fault. 483 from T. SOUTHERN's Loyal Brothers. 484 from Philip Van Artevelde. 509 from Madoc's narrative of the battle between the Hoamen or

tribe of Erillyab, and the Aztecars, or people of Aztlan: 1. 15, the arrow of the omen: 'The Tlaxcaltecas had two arrows, which they regarded with great reverence, and by which they augured the event of a battle. Two of their bravest chiefs were to shoot them at the enemy, and recover them or die. If the arrow struck and wounded, it was held an omen that the fight would be prosperous; but if they neither struck, nor drew blood, the army retired.'

TORQUEMADA, 1. 3t, quoted in SOUTHEY's Works, Vol. v. p. 56. 511 from Prometheus Unbound, Act ii. sc. 3. 514 from The Double Marriage, Act ii. sc. 3. 515 from Romeo and Juliet, Act ii. sc. 3: 1. 5, fleckéd, dappled,

streaked. 516 1. I, grace, efficacious virtue : l. 4, to the earth, i.e. to the

inhabitants of the earth : 1. II, with that part, i. e. the sense

that smells. 517 from Midsummer Night's Dream, Act iv. sc. 1: 1. 1, vaward,

the early part of the day: 1. 9, flewed, with large chaps, deep

mouthed : sanded, of a sandy colour. - 521 from Act v. sc. 5: 1. 5, fell of hair, my hairy part: fell is skin

or hide with the hair or wool on it. Thus King Lear, Act v.

sc. 3: The gougeres shall devcur them flesh and fell. 526 1. 6, palmy, planted with palm-trees. 528 l. 11, ballasséd, i. q. ballasted. 529 1. 4, huddling, hurrying : madrigal, a species of musical com

position : l. 10, his next joy, his younger son : 1. 11, toy, trifle. 530 l. 2, sadly, seriously. 531 l. 11, charactered, graven : l. 12, crofts, a croft is a small home.

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531 close in a farm : 1. 13, bottom-glade, glade in the bottom or

valley. 532 1. 4, by then, by the time that: 1. 6, besprent, besprinkled : 1. 11, meditate, practise, Lat. meditari: comp. Lycidas, v. 66:

and strictly meditate the thankless Muse: 1. 12, had, i. e. should have, satis habuisset : ere a close, ere I

came to an end. 540 1. 10, I, i. q. aye. 543 from Taming of the Shrew, Act iv. sc. 3: 1. 6, peereth, appeareth. 545 l. 14, common trade, common resort. 546 from Thyestes, a tragedy, 1681. 547 from H. TAYLOR'S Philip Van Artevelde, Act ii. sc. 5. 549 from All's Well that ends Well, Act i. sc. I: 1. 12, capable of

every line, sensible, open to, the impression produced by every

lineament, and trace of his sweet countenance. 550 l. 10, painted imagery, tapestry hung from the windows. 558 1. 8, forestalled remission, a pardon solicited in advance, when it

should have been proffered unasked. 559 1. 2, hearsed, see note on § 13, PART I. 561 from The Renegado, Act iv. sc. 3. 562 from Maon and Moriat. 566 from Duchess of Malfi, Act v. sc. 3. 567 from Philaster, Act iii. sc. 2. 571 from Jane Shore, Act v. sc. 1. 573 1. 6, Bermoothes, Bermudas : 1. 11, flote, i. e. the waves, sea. 574 from The Great Duke of Florence, Act i. sc. 1. 576 from The Duke of Milan, Act i. sc. I. 579 from A Wife for a Month, Act ii. sc. 2. 580 from All for Love, Act i. sc. 1. 588 from The Virgin Martyr, Act iii. sc. 2. 595 from Sardanapalus, Act i. sc. 2. 599 from The Double Marriage, Act iv. sc. 1. 602 from The Maid's Tragedy, Act ii. sc. 2. 603 from The Two Noble Kinsmen, Act i. sc. 1. 616 1. 3, kinde, nature, as in Shakespeare, Ant. and Cleop. Act v.

sc. 2, to do his kind, to act according to his nature: 1. 15, with. out protract, without delay : 1. 16, in ure, i. q. in use, in prac

tice: in Chaucer, the word means 'fortune,' adventure.' 623 1. 10, Milton has several imitations of this beautiful passage:

v. Comus, v. 205 and v. 432 : 1. 15, tole, originally 'to pull' (whence to toll a bell,' i. e. to pull), but usual in the sense of

to draw on by enticement, illicere. 625 from All for Love: 1. 9, he comes, sc. Dolabella.

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628 l. 15, metaphysical, supernatural.
630 l. 3, n'occasion, ne, i. e. no occasion.

1 637 l. 2, charm, song. "The verb to charm was used in the sense

of to utter musical sounds, whether by voice or instruments, from ciarma, Ital.' NARES' Gloss. s. v. Comp. SPENSER, Shep. Cal. Oct. v. 1181 :

Here we our slender pipes may safely charm. 640 1. 13, abated, cast down, depressed. 642 1. 7, hearse, see note, $ 13, 1. 1, PART 1. 645 from Cæsar and Pompey, a tragedy, 1631. 646 delighted, i.q. delighted in, delighting. 647 from Albertus Wallenstein, 1634. 664 from Edward the First, 1593: 1. 17, flig, fledged. 665 from The Prophetess, Act iv. sc. 5. 668 from Philip Van Artevelde, Part 1. Act iv. sc. 2. 669 from The Mourning Bride, Act ii. sc. 1. 671 from Flowers, p. 31. 684 1. 11, garnered up, treasured up : .1. 15, turn thy complexion

there, at such an object do thou, patience, thyself change colour. 690 from The Two Noble Kinsmen, Act ii. sc. I. 691 from The Gentleman Usher. 716 from The Deforned Transformed, Act i. sc. 1. 725 from The Bashful Lover, Act i. sc. 2. 728 from Tancred and Sigismunda, Act i. sc. 4. 731 1. 8, capable, capacious : 1. 15, execution, employment, exercise :

1. 17, shall be in me remorse, obedience to your command shall

be the feeling continually preying upon my mind. 732 1. 5, entrance, surface. 741 1. 8, wreak, revenge: 1. 9, maims of shame, disgraceful diminu

tions of territory. 742 1. 8, I clip the anvil of my sword, i. e. Coriolanus, because he

had laid as many heavy blows upon him as a smith strikes on

his anvil. 747 1. 12, the cue for passion, i.e. the hint or prompt word for passion. 750 l. 9, it yearns, it grieves, vexes. 752 l. 2, sith, since. 754 from The Maid's Tragedy, Act i. sc. I. 758 from Tyrannic Love, Act iv. sc. 2. 759 from The Mourning Bride, Act iii. sc. 2. 761 l. 2, his, its : 1. 11, censure, opinion. 762 l. 4, deedless in his tongue, no trumpeter of his own actions :

1. 11, subscribes, yields : 1. 18, translate him, explain his cha

racter. 765 from The Tragedy of Nero.

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77o 1. 3, merit, reward. 771 1. 7, repairs, refreshes : 1. 12, hide their levity in honour, cover

their petty faults with great merit. 772 1. 15, mere fathers of their garments, who have only judgment

enough to invent new fashions of dress. 779 from Coelum Brito icum, a masque at Whitehall, Feb. 1633. 783 from The Triumph of Time. 787 1. 21, cordevan, Spanish leather. 789 1. 8, play the touch, act the touchstone. 792 from Sardanapalus, Act i. sc. 2, 795 from the Comedy of all Fools. 799 1. 17, Athenous, Lib. xiv. p. 632 α:. 'Αριστόξενος εν τοις συμ

μικτους συμποτικούς όμοιον (φησί) ποιούμεν Ποσειδωνιάταις τους εν τω Τυρσηνικό κόλπο κατοικούσιν, οίς συνέβη τα μεν εξ αρχής Έλλησιν ούσιν εκβεβαρβαρώσθαι Τυρρηνοϊς η Ρωμαίοις γεγονόσι, και την τε φωνήν μεταβεβληκέναι τά τε λοιπά των επιτηδευμάτων, άγειν τε μίαν τινά αυτούς των εορτών των Ελληνικών έτι και νύν, εν ή συνιόντες αναμιμνήσκονται των αρχαίων εκείνων ονομάτων τε και νομίμων, και απολοφυρόμενοι προς αλλήλους και

αποδακρύσαντες απέρχονται.' 805 from The Faithful Friends, Act iv. sc. 1. 806 from All for Love, Act iii. sc. 1. Comp. Shakespeare, Antony

and Cleopatra, Act ii. sc. 2. 807 from Antonio and Mellida, 808 from Philaster, Act iv. sc. 4. 809 1. 6, artificial, ingenious, artful. This pathetic complaint has

been compared by Gibbon to Gregory of Nazianzen's beautiful
lines on the loss of his friendship with Basil:

πόνοι κοινοι λόγων
ομόστεγός τε και ξυνέστιος βίος,
νούς εις εν αμφοίν...
διεσκέδασται πάντα κάρριπται χάμαι,

αύραι φέρoυσι τας παλαίας ελπίδας.
'Shakespeare,' remarks the Historian, “had never read the
poem of Gregory Nazianzen, he was ignorant of the Greek
language; but his mother-tongue, the language of nature, is

the same in Cappadocia and Britain. 810 from Palamon and Arcite, Book i. 1. 55. 811 l. 19, gruff, flat on the face. „813 1. 15, tend the savage strangeness he puts on, attend upon the

brutish distant rudeness he assumes: 1. 17, underwrite, submit to: cf. King Lear, Act iii. sc. 2: you owe me no subscription: in an observing kind, in an attentive manner.

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